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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

1989 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FOR THE 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 




Prepared by the 
Town Manager 



January 1, 1989 Through 
December 31, 1989 



PURSUANT TO M PROVISION Of CHATER 40, 

SECiVJN 49 Of W GiHSAL IAWS Of TH£ 
COf^OMWEAlTM Of MASSACHUSETTS AND AkilUl R . 
SECTION FOUR Of THE BflAWS Of THE 

TOWN OF ANDOVER. 




To the Taxpayers and Residents of the Town of Andover: 

Ladies and gentlemen, this letter notes the end of 1989, the conclusion of the decade of the 80' s, and 
of my tenure as Town Manager of the Town of Andover. 

The year 1989 was a difficult and far from satisfying year in which major budgetary cutbacks had 
to be made due to loss of revenue from the State. The cutbacks on the Town and School side were met 
with renewed dedication on the part of the loyal employees. Nonetheless, they could not pick up all of 
the slack, and I'm certain that many of you found some cutback in your services despite the efforts of 
the staff. The two greatest successes of the year were the completion of the new Water Treatment Plant 
which is providing Andover with the finest water in New England, if not in the entire country, and the 
rededication of the Old Town Hall. Its subsequent acceptance by the community and the tremendous 
amount of use that it has gotten since its rededication justify the work and the expense. In addition, 
since the first of the year, the Senior Citizen Walk-In Center has been dedicated and is receiving a great 
deal of use. Mr. Torrisi, as Acting Town Manager, has been successful in getting the U.S. Postal 
Service to agree to put a 300 Box Postal Service and Retail Facility in the part of the Town Hall that 
used to be the Clerk's Office. This should be in operation by mid-summer 1990. Mrs. Terry Morgan 
at Phillips Academy is conducting a fundraising drive to complete the theatre organ that is set up in the 
Town Hall. This was donated by the late Earl Miller and a group of his friends. The work on it has 
gone very slowly since Mr. Miller's death. Anyone interested in the theatre organ should feel free to 
contact Mrs. Morgan directly. 

The decade of the eighties has been kind to the Town of Andover. The achievements within that 
decade include the Collins Center, the School Expansion and Improvement Program, the playing field 
revitalization, the expansion and improvement of Memorial Hall Library, the Town Offices, the 
beautification of Central Park, and many improvements to the water system. In addition to the new 
Treatment Plant, which includes additional above-ground storage, many extensions and cross-connections 
improving pressure throughout the Town have been made, The Riverina Road Pumping Station was 
replaced by the Tantalion Road Pumping Station, ensuring the safety and sanitation of the residents of 
Shawsheen while providing adequate capacity for our increasing sewerage flow. 

The tax base of the community continues to prosper, having expanded from approximately one-half 
billion dollars to approximately three and one-half billion dollars in the decade, including modern plants 
in all of the industrial areas of the Town. The Central Business District has benefited not only through 
the action of the Town in providing additional parking and refurbishing and expanding of public facilities, 
but also through the reconstruction and expansion of BayBank, the Andover Bank, and the renovation 
of the Barnard Building. Park Street Village is a welcome addition to the Downtown area as are the 
new restaurants that grace the Andover area. 

Dr. Seifert and the School Committee are to be commended for the excellent education that they have 
continued to provide the community within the constraints of Proposition 2 1/2. 



-1- 



Public Safety has continued to be remarkably effective. The Accreditation of the Police Department 
was only the eighty-seventh in the country among seventeen thousand potential agencies. This speaks well 
for your Police force. During the decade the policy of sending firefighters to the State Fire Academy 
before starting them on duty was instituted, was expanded ambulance service to the community. A 
centralized dispatch system combining the Police and Fire Dispatch operations was implemented. All 
current police, fire and rescue apparatus was purchased during the decade, providing modern and 
effective technology to serve you, the taxpayers and residents of the Town of Andover. 

The Town has been well served by the Moderator, Selectmen, and School Committees during this 
decade. They, along with the Department Heads, the Staff, the School Superintendent, his Staff and 
Teachers, the many volunteers who serve on the Boards and Committees, are a great resource to the 
Town of Andover and I wish to thank them specifically for their services during this trying period of 
time. 

It is with mixed emotion that I turn the position of Town Manager over to Acting Town Manager 
Anthony J. Torrisi and Reginald S. Stapczynski, who was chosen by the Board of Selectmen as the next 
Town Manager. I am confident of their competence and their dedication to the community. Nonetheless, 
after more than eight years of service, I will miss the daily contact with the residents and the opportunity 
to serve the community. 

I want to thank everyone in the community for the support they have given to me during my terms 
of office. Andover is a great community; and with your continued support for my successors, it will 
continue to prosper and provide the life style and amenities that you, the residents of the community, 
deserve and rightfully have come to expect. 



Respectfully yours, 

Kenneth R. Mahony 
Former Town Manger 



■^7x4/ 




-2- 




Dear Citizens of Andover: 

It was with much regret that last Fall the Board of Selectmen was asked to accept the resignation of 
Town Manager Kenneth Mahony. For the past eight years, Mr. Mahony has faithfully served both this 
Board and the residents of Andover. His term saw the completion of many building projects throughout 
the Town, in spite of the ever-increasing budget crunch occurring in all municipalities of the 
Commonwealth. 

This resignation set in motion the Board of Selectmen's search for a new Town Manager, a 
responsibility that is, without a doubt, the most significant task that any town Board of Selectmen can 
undertake. We fully understand that through the Town Manager, the Board carries out the policies 
defined by the citizens, and that the relationship between the Manager and the Board must be based on 
trust, confidence in the Manager's administrative capabilities, ongoing communication, and a clear 
definition of priorities for the Town. 

In the end, 102 applications were received by the Town and reviewed individually by each member 
of the Board. Choosing to act as a Search Committee itself, the Board narrowed the applicant pool to 
a list of three, whose names were presented to the public on March 12. As of the writing of this letter, 
the public phase of the process was just beginning. A full accounting of the final outcome is expected 
to be presented in next year's report. 

The second greatest challenge for this year's Board was dealing with the reduction in state aid after 
our 1988-89 budget was approved at the April Town Meeting. Faced with trimming a total of $376,715 
from Town Departmental budgets, the Selectmen supported the Town Manager's recommendation to 
reorganize the Community Services Department. While reluctandy we had to eliminate the positions of 
department head and two clerks, the remaining support staff and a dedicated volunteer Community 
Services Committee kept the program active and viable. 

Additional budget cuts came in the areas of Community Development and Planning, Municipal 
Maintenance, Data Processing Support, and Public Safety in the form of overtime reduction and deferral 
of equipment purchases. A Special Town Meeting called on March 12th, approved these reductions. 

With the possibility of a further reduction in state aid this coming year, the Board of Selectmen, 
School Committee, Finance Committee, and Planning Board sponsored the distribution of a "Town Wide 
Survey." Modeled after a survey distributed in 1976, this year's survey asked citizens to rate and 
prioritize town services and issues. The Board anticipates that this information, once tabulated, will help 
it to develop Town-wide policy and to more clearly understand the needs of the residents in a time of 
increasing demands and decreasing revenues. 



-3- 



Looking back on the year, we saw the Board members continuing their commitments of active 
involvement in the life of the community and surrounding areas. In addition to our regular meetings on 
the first and third Mondays of the month, we find ourselves out many nights as liaison to Andover Town 
Committees. This helps us to gain a further perspective on the concerns of the residents and a sense of 
the sizeable tasks our committees are called to perform. 

Board members have also participated in the Chamber of Commerce's Business/Legislative Caucus, 
a monthly forum for the airing of business and governmental issues and including the City of Lawrence 
and the Towns of North Andover and Methuen. A further expansion of our knowledge base has occurred 
through Elder Advocate workshops, Massachusetts Municipal Association-sponsored meetings, Municipal 
Forums dealing with updates on local laws, and the Essex County Advisory Board. 

When you add to this list social functions we support, official duties, joint meetings and work 
sessions, you may get a feeling for the scope of Selectmen's responsibilities and how this benefits the 
Town. 

A highlight for the Town this past year was the rededication of the Town House, better known as the 
Old Town Hall. Surpassing our expectations in beauty, this historic building has become a source of 
pride and a symbol of the respect that the Town has for its citizens. The second floor auditorium comes 
alive nearly every weekend as civic and community group take advantage of its location and its historic 
ambiance. March saw the partial realization of our plans for the first floor, as community service offices 
were relocated, enabling the building to be open during the week. While the status of the Post Office 
opening is still unknown, we believe that the Town Offices alone, will become more and more viable to 
the community as a resource center and meeting place. 

The final area of the first floor, located at the east end of the building, has also opened as a drop- 
in center for the Town's Senior Citizens. Hearing a loud and clear request by the Seniors as reflected 
in the 1987 report of the Senior Opportunity Panel, a drop-in center was supported by many Town 
Officials - and vigorously by this Board of Selectmen - and so stands as a dream that has finally come 
to fruitation. The drop-in center was furnished through funds from the Council on Aging budget, and 
will be staffed by volunteers. 

1989 also saw an expansion of the Town's shuttle bus service to include the Doctor's Park offices 
and the Ballardvale area. These routes include access to Recreation Park, several Senior housing areas, 
the Shawsheen Plaza shopping complex, Town Offices and the Senior Center. The Selectmen support 
an ongoing study of ways to improve this service, and we always welcome your suggestions. 

Our Town was honored last November with a visit by the 41st President of the United States, George 
Bush. President Bush accepted an invitation from his alma mater, Phillips Academy, to participate in a 
Convocation celebrating the 200th anniversary of the campus visit of our country's first president, George 
Washington. The elaborate security preparations that the Town had to undertake prior to and during the 
visit gave all of us a unique insight into the lives of all of our Presidents. 

This coming year, the current economic climate and its effect on our downtown business district is 
likely to be a critical issue. While initial discussions have seen the Board divided on both the cause and 
the solution, we do agree that we cannot allow basic services to disappear. The announced closing of our 
only downtown, full-service grocery market has sparked an examination of way to reverse this trend. 
Too many residents of Andover depend on the ability to walk downtown for their day-to-day needs. For 
this reason, I believe that the Board has a strong responsibility to protect this area. 



-4- 



In a split decision, tax classification at a IS per cent differential between residential and 
commercial/industrial property was supported, but it is also clear that further discussions need to take 
place to better understand classification's actual impact on both business and the residents, particularly 
in the long term. New property assessments in the coming year should help us in future discussions along 
this line. 

A task I hope to see completed in 1990 is the development of a Policy Guideline manual. While the 
Board has been without such a document for over a decade, the lack of clear policy definitions puts 
residents - and the Board during deliberations - at a clear disadvantage. The Board should take the hiring 
of a new Town Manager as additional incentive to define procedures and expectations. This is something, 
in my opinion, the Board owes to the new Town Manager, and could actually make the difference 
between a smooth or a rough transition. 

I close by saying that none of the above could have been accomplished without the support of many 
people. On behalf of the Board of Selectmen - Jim Barenboim, Jerry Silverman, Charlie Wesson, Bill 
Downs, and myself - I would like to thank former Town Manager Ken Mahony and Acting Town 
Manager, Tony Torrisi, whose ability to maintain "business as usual" during the transition to a new 
Town Manager is much appreciated. 

The Board recognizes the contributions of our Town employees who continually make the extra effort 
that is reflected in the Town's outstanding reputation throughout the state. Also, the countless hours 
willingly volunteered by members of the Town boards and committees who offer valuable support and 
insight into the needs and trends in the Town. 

Finally, we offer our thanks and appreciation to the citizens of the Town of Andover, whose concerns 
and interests have "kept us on our toes" and made us a better Board of Selectmen. We can only hope 
that our contributions during this past year have earned your confidence and respect. 



With Sincere Regards, 

C 




sJoul <¥. 

Gail L. Ralston 

Chairman 

Andover Board of Selectmen 




-5- 



TOWN CLERK 

As the Town of Andover's official statistician, managing vital records has always been one of this office's 
major responsibilities. Over the last decade, 2636 Births and 1887 Deaths were recorded and 2353 
Marriage Intentions were filed for a total of 6876 new vital records being added to the Town's archives 
for management and historical preservation. The most significant change for this office was the 
computerization of the Town's census and voter records. These required and important functions over 
the years haven taken many forms. With the implementation of the census by mail and in-house 
computerization, we are now able to keep accurate and timely records of the Town's population and voter 
registration. The Clerk's office will face many challenges during the next decade and, as always, 
providing quality service to townspeople as we face an increase in demand for service will be our major 
priority. 

At the conclusion of 1989, the total number of registered voters was 17,078 divided among eight 
precincts as follows: 



1 - 1,864 


3 - 2,203 


5-2,190 


7 - 2,212 


2-2,173 


4-2,105 


6-2,140 


8-2,191 



The following statistical and financial reports are for the period January 1, 1989 to December 31, 
1989. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

TOTAL 

Number of Births Recorded: Males: 144 - Females: 133 277 

Number of Marriages Recorded: 225 

Number of Deaths Recorded: Males: 92 - Females: 90 182 

Number of Dog Licenses Sold: 1,488 

Number of Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold: 827 

Other monies collected: 

Marriage Licenses 2,240.00 

Certified Copies 5,408.00 

U.C.C. 6,367.00 

Misc. Licenses 12,380.00 

A.B.C. Licenses 94,620.00 

Business Certificates 961.00 

Misc. (Street Lists, Maps, Etc.) 7,516.27 

Dog Licenses 7,829.00 

Fishing & Hunting Licenses 9,546.30* 



$146,867.57 
*$9, 190.00 in fees sent to Division of Fisheries and Game - $356.00 retained by the Town. 

-6- 



BMBM Dgparhnent Highlight* (1980-1989) 



financial Planning mi Ba frtf 

■ Maintained strong AA rating from Moody's Investor's Service. On a nationwide bases, only 12% of 
8,000 governmental bodies has a AA or higher rating. 

■ Provided long-term financial plan to meet the water and sewerage needs of the town. 

■ Managed annual budget within the revenue limitations of Proposition 2 1/2. New construction within 
the Town, the development of local revenue sources, the hard work of Department Heads and staff, 
and cooperation and agreement among the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee and Finance 
Committee have been the prime factors in this accomplishment. The retreat of Federal assistance and 
the gradual and potential reductions in State assistance, will make the above very difficult to continue. 

■ Appointed as the state representative to the National Government Finance Officer Association for 1987 
and 1988. 

■ Elected first president of Massachusetts Government Finance Officer Association for 1985-1987. 

BMM Opfitimf 

■ Collector-Treasurer's office assumed responsibility for collecting all town revenues. This centralization 
expedited deposits to maximize interest earnings for the Town and also provided the public with quick 
check clearing. 

■ Purchasing Office established and participated in inter-municipal collaborative bids. This cooperative 
purchasing saved hundreds of thousands of dollars over the decade. 

■ Assessor's office maintained and updated property values with a major revaluation in 1982, and updated 
values in 1985 and 1988. Andover's equalized property value as calculated by the State, has moved 
our statewide ranking among the 351 Massachusetts Communities from 28 in 1980, to 18 in 1988. 
Taxable property value in Town as of January 1, 1989 was more than $3.28 billion. The computerized 
assessment system provided by the Commonwealth in 1989 will guide Andover's Assessor's office in 
the 1990's. 

■ Data Processing office implemented computerization of Town finance operations and many non-financial 
functions. Improvements in productivity were extraordinary and information timely and accurate. Major 
financial applications are centrally controlled by data processing while more extensive use of personal 
computers has been implemented in offices to continue to increase productivity. 

■ Veteran's Services office not only provided assistance to needy Veteran's and their families, but also 
assisted other town departments in promoting patriotic celebrations and coordinating the town's trash 
pick-up and recycling programs. 

Capital Impnwmentt In Public Fadffiet 

■ During the decade of the 1980's over $65 million was approved by the Town Meeting to maintain and 
improve upon the facilities and utilities of the town. Over $17 million was invested in school buildings 
and facilities, over $14 million in other public buildings and facilities, more than $1 1/2 million in open 
space acquisition, $10 million in sewerage improvements and $22 1/2 million in water improvements 
including the expansion of the Water Treatment Plant. The Town's commitment to continued 
investment must continue in the 1990's. 

-7- 



CENTRAL PURCHASING 

There were approximately 2100 orders processed for the Town Government and 4701 orders 
processed for the School Department during 1989. Approximately 46 bid openings were held. The 
continued use of State Bids and contracts has proved to be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase a 
single item or a wide range of goods and services such as: paper products for copy machines, police 
vehicles, road salt, chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels and supplies. 

Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in 1989: 



Finance Committee Report 

Removal, Replacement & Repair of Roofing 

& Flashing & associated work at Andover 

High School. 

Pre-Fab Building (Temporary Classrooms) 

Sidewalk - Andover St. & Clark Road 

Sewer on North Street 

Water Main - Glennwood Road 

School Supplies & Equipment 

School Lunch (7 items) 

Highway Department Equipment 

Water Meters 

Playground Equipment 



- Custom Fire Pumper 

- West Parish Drive Sewer 

- Misc. Road Materials & Concrete Pipe 

- Painting of Road Markings 

- Reconstruction of Tennis Courts- 
Andover High School 

- Band Uniforms 

- 2 Fuel Dispensers (Pumps) - 
1 Gasoline/ 1 diesel 

- Surface Water Drainage 

- York Street Reconstruction 

- Office Supplies, Equipment and 
Furniture 



The office of Central Purchasing is responsible for contract compliance regarding Andover's 
Affirmative Action Plan, and insurance coordination and risk management for all Town and School 
Departments with the exception of health and personal insurance which are handled by the Central 
Personnel Office. 

Areas of importance in the 80' s where Central Purchasing and Insurance Coordination were able to 
save dollars for the Town of Andover: 

- Collaborative Bid on Gasoline and Diesel Fuel involving twelve towns. 

- Collaborative Bid on Fuel Oil (#2 and #4) involving 7-10 towns. 

- Collaborative Bid on copy machine paper involving 7 towns. 

- Collaborative Bid on Student Insurance involving 5 towns. 

- Introduction of catastrophe Accident Medical 

- Coverage for all Interscholastic Athletics and Band Activities. 

- Introduction of Various other Insurance coverages available to students throughout the year. 

- Contracts for Various Major Projects throughout the Town. 

- Introduction of the recycling of good condition Police vehicles to use in other Town departments. 

- Creation of Safety Handbook for all employees, Town and School. 

- Setting up of Safety Programs for all employees, Town and School. 

- Introduction of various programs to the advantage of the Town and School employees. 



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-10- 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1989 









BALANCE 








I1AI ANCI 


FUND 


BENEFICIARY 


PRINCIPAL 


JULY I, 1988 


DEPOSITS 


INCOME 


DRAWN 


(UN -30 *•) 


STABILIZATION 


TOWN 




440.235.50 


60,000.00 


40,0<X>.43 




540.235 93 


RETIREMENT 


TOWN 




1,257.075.90 




37,971.44 


800,000.00 


495.047.34 


CD. WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




456,858.77 




39,453.40 




49A.3I2.I7 


INSURANCE 


TOWN 




283,706.20 


5,826.15 


22,950.17 


22.457.32 


290,025 J" 


UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 






93,767.76 


20,000.00 


8,583.00 


8.855.07 


1 I3.4VO.JV 


POST WAR REHABILITATION 


TOWN 




24,283.07 




2.143.80 




26,426 s7 


T.A. ENERGY AUDIT 






4,125.95 




25.84 


4,151.79 


1 


ESTATES. P. WHITE 




5,766.63 


6,691.13 




549.08 




7.240 21 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




765. 1 1 


1,825.00 


35.42 


830.00 


1.795 53 


PUBLIC SAFETY GRANT 






1,316.86 




54.03 


1,370.89 





STATE GRANT MDCR 






1.948.32 




176.25 




2.124.57 


TOWN HALL RESTORATION 






140.63 




1 1 .32 




151.95 


CDAP SPECIAL TRUST 




14,300.00 


14,928.64 




378 84 


13,456.00 


1.851.48 


CD&PTDJ SPECIAL 




200,000.00 


205.347.79 


3,972.00 


17.492.46 


36.006.79 


190.805 46 


TOWN INSURANCE 






259,294.28 


2,180,575.22 


58.221.40 


1.895,188.56 


602.902. ."4 


TOWN INSURANCE (CHECKING) 






73,194.16 






75,194.10 





M.V LIBRARY CONSORTIUM 


LIBRARY 




185.025.61 


332,434.18 


17.197.73 


190.719.10 




J. GREELEY 


LIBRARY 


5,000.00 


5.610.03 




616.41 


1.226.44 




MARGARET G.TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345,825.50 


345,825.50 








345.825 =■ 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


INCOME 




148,756.47 




5?. 697. 45 


57,418.42 


125.035.50 


JOHN CORNELL 




5.000.00 


22,501.94 




I.STJ si 




24.37.1. 7J 


DAVID £ LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10,000.00 


24,175.36 




1.948.70 




2o.l24.iV, 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7,845.81 


19,012.51 


116.26 


1.530.51 


58.13 


20.WM.I5 


A.J LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5,000.00 


10,967.73 




968.28 




i i ,93ft m| 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1,302.77 


1,500.00 




120.75 


1 16.25 


l,5"4 .50 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


701.81 




56.50 




758.31 


SPRING GROVE 






371,349.79 


19,092.00 


32.557.28 




422,999 07 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




17.709.73 








I7.70v.73 


SOUTH CHURCH CEMETERY 


INTERSET 




1.942.50 




156.37 


150.54 


1.94* 33 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


LOT SALES 




46.701.22 


9,693.00 


4.635.55 




1 


WEST PARISH 






2.310.00 




185.90 


179.03 


2.3|o.v3 


CHRIST CHURCH 






7.610.00 




612.61 


589.78 




ST. AUGISTINES 






650.00 




52.33 


50.38 


«SI .95 


i:\III.INI-: LINCOLN 


A.V IS 




1,000.00 




80.50 


77.50 


1 .iX13.no 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 


AVIS 


1,000.00 


544.60 




43. 84 


42.21 


; l 23 


CONSERVATION FUND 


CONSERVATION 






14,337.00 


40.39 




1 1.377.39 


SUN. SET ROCK EXT 


HAMMOND WAY 






41,329.29 


1,990.31 


30,0 


I3.3iti.6i1 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


PRINCIPAL 




21,785.03 


1,000.00 


1.366.63 


120.00 


2 4. "31.00 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1. 000.00 


5,568.22 




448.24 




o.r.lo io 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


INCOME 




12.05 




0.70 




12.81 


I'ARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


911.54 




73.38 


.-,., on 


954 -J 


RAI.I.ARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


775.12 




02.40 


25 .hi 


812.52 


Al M.N 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


181.22 




14.59 




l»5 SI 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1.000.00 


5.834.32 




409.00 




6.303.98 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


4.531.50 




364.79 




4.S»ii.29 


A. & A.V. LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1,000.00 


3,044.49 




245.08 




3.289.57 


RAFrON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 








m.v 50 


RAFTON (INTEREST) 






999.00 


32.00 


81.93 


150.00 


902.93 


CON ROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


250.00 


591.59 




47.62 




039.21 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200.00 


436.91 




35.17 




4T2.08 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


50.00 


268.89 




2 1 .65 




>"54 


GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 






4,385,113.25 


2,690.232.10 


329,643.(41 


3.138.463.36 


4.200.525.05 



-11- 



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-12- 



JOHN CORNELL WOOD AND COAL FUND 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 17, of the 1893 Town Meeting. 
Five thousand dollars, ($5,000.00) was left to the Town to be used for the needy poor, to purchase wood 
or coal. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 



Balance on Hand 7/1/88 $22,501.94 

Income 1988/89 1,872.81 

Disbursed - - 



Balance on Hand 7/1/89 $24,374.75 



MARGARET C.TWUE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-term resident of Andover, bequeathed 
the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a permanent trust 
fund. This is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the 
income form this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement of assistance for worthy persons 
residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need or aid, comfort or support on account of old age, 
disability or unemployment. 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance with 
the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable groups and 
organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-six (26) cases, disbursing $ 45,843.87 
on approved cases (which numbered nineteen) and small administration expenses. Only the income of 
the Fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is 
invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon 
vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of 12/31/88 $128,470. 14 

Receipts - 1989 46,676.41 



$175,146.55 
Disbursements - 1989 45,843.87 



Balance of Income as of 12/31/89 $129,302.68 



-13- 



ANDOVER gffifflUMB. INC. 



The year 1989 was a year of unprecedented interest in recycling! Public awareness of the general solid 
waste situation and the environmental and economic impact of this reality put demands on Andover 
Recycling to expand our services in the following ways: 

1. Apartment complexes, and public and private schools in Andover asked for assistance in recycling 
newspaper, cardboard, and computer paper. RESULT: Our paper contractor, Greg Graham, now picks 
up from numerous apt. complexes and schools. 

2. A styrofoam recycling plant opened in Leominster, MA in June, 1989. Thus, Andover Recycling 
members worked with the school administration and staff to design a program that would reduce the 
amount of styrofoam being burned in the North Andover incinerator, adding to possible air pollution. 
RESULT: All public schools in Andover collect and recycle styrofoam products in their cafeterias. Dave 
White of North Atlantic Recycling Services, Inc., picks up the styrofoam at no charge and sells it to 
Leominister. 

3. Increase in volume of glass and plastic being recycled every third Sat. of each month. RESULT: 
Andover Recycling was given permission by Town officials to expand the program in Dec. 1989 to every 
first (and third) Sat. and to use a larger parking lot, West Middle School. Hours changed to 9am -1pm. 
Andover Recycling members continue to volunteer to assist the public in sorting these materials. Dave 
White collects these products and sells them to recycling plants. 

The members of Andover Recycling devoted time and effort during the year in various ways. 

1. to write a weekly column in the Andover Townsman, "Recycling", serving as a vital link with the 
townspeople, increasing their awareness of pertinent issues. 

2. to provide invaluable assistance and knowledge to special environmental to projects in several schools. 

3. to assist the DPW with the design of comprehensive solid waste program that would encourage the 
expansion of recycling and save the Town valuable tax dollars. 

4. to provide volunteers for the Household Hazardous Waste Collection program. 

5. to work with Town officials on the implementation of a leaf composting program. 

6. to assist many individuals in Andover and other towns that call us with their particular concerns. 

7. to attend regional meetings regarding recycling issues. 

Other facts of interest: 

1. General increase in newspaper recycling causes mill (North Shore Recycled Fibers, Salem, MA) to 
lower price per ton from $5 to $2.50 in August 1989. 



-14- 



2. Andover Recycling continues to pay Dave White $100 per month to collect glass each month and 
receive $0 for the glass. 

3. There continues to be no charge from Dave White for the collection of plastic and $0 received. 

4. The cost to the Town for this program remains at $60,000. (Fiscal '89 and '90) 

5. The savings to the Town for this program is the tonnage that is never dumped in the North Andover 
incinerator at $64 per ton: 

- 1,629 tons (13.2%) of the total residential solid waste was recycled. 

- $104,256 = cost to tip (North Andover incinerator) 1,629 tons @ $64/ton. 

- $104,256 minus $60,000 (cost to Town for recycling program) = $44,256 SAVED. 

Highlights of 1980's 

1. Steady increase during the 80's in paper and glass tonnage recycled (160 tons/month), whereas the 
70's were within a consistent range (100 tons/month) 

2. Greater involvement schools and individuals in recycling programs. 

3. Nov. 1988, plastic recycling begins in Andover with incredible enthusiasm! 




-15- 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The Department of Veterans Services assisted twenty-five families during 1989, with funds to help 
pay for food, clothing, medical, fuel, and personal needs. Eleven Veterans were admitted to Veterans 
Administration Hospitals this year for in-house treatment., at no Town expense. All expenditures of this 
Department fall under Chapter 1 15 of the Massachusetts General Laws, and are reimbursed 75% to the 
Town. Over the past ten years this office has established a close working relationship with Federal 
medical facilities in Massachusetts at no cost to them. 

The Veteran's Agent is also the burial agent and graves' registration officer. During the year 1989, 
thirty-six Veteran's died, three World War I, twenty-eight World War II, three Korean and two Vietnam. 
Over the past ten years the Veteran's Services office has assisted the dependents of four hundred and 
twenty-seven veterans in making application for burial benefits, headstone markers, insurance and 
widows' and children's' pensions as qualified. 

The Veterans' Services Office formed a "Street of Memorial Flags Committee" for the purpose of 
memorializing and paying tribute to Andover's deceased Veterans by collecting their government-issued 
casket flags and flying them on designated holidays form utility poles in Andover's streets. The 
Committee later changed its name to the "Andover Patriotic Holiday Committee". Through its' efforts 
the Veteran's Day ceremonies and the Memorial Day parade and services are participated in and attended 
by large numbers of public-spirited citizens. 

The Committee has hung in the Andover Town Offices, a memorial plaque honoring Andovers' veterans 
who lost their lives in World War C. Another plaque honors Andover's four recipients of the Medal of 
Honor and a third plaque pays tribute to the sixty-one women from the Town who served in the Armed 
forces during a wartime period. A plaque was also erected at the Ballard vale Green honoring the 
Andover men killed in Korea and Vietnam, and at the Warren Charles Deyermond Memorial Sports Field 
on Chandler Road another plaque was erected in memory of Mr. Deyermond who 
was killed in the Vietnam War. 

Individuals who served on this committee are: 

Richard J. Bowen Virginia H. Cole Edward J. Morrissey 

James L. Bamford William T. Downs John C. Doherty 

Robert M. Henderson Harold F. Hayes William C. Mackenzie 

John J. Lewis 



ton BMfiB 

During the year 1989, twenty-four new cases were brought against the Town of Andover. Sixteen cases 
were successfully disposed of, leaving a balance of one hundred forty-nine cases pending litigation. Town 
counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal 
opinions were researched and rendered to Town Officials. Town Counsel rendered in excess of eighty 
informal opinions and had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town Officials on almost a 
daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. During 
the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, 
releases, agreements and betterment assessments were drafted, reviewed and recorded. 



-16- 



FUS DEPARTMENT 

The Andover Fire Department was established and is maintained by the municipality to provide 
protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, explosion or other causes. The 
objectives of fire protection are to prevent fires from starting, to prevent loss of life and property in case 
of fire, to confine fire to the place of origin and to extinguish it. From the point of view of Town 
government, this involves the services of fire prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it 
requires positive and dramatic action, has far greater appeal to people and fire fighters than fire 
prevention measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative "interference" with what 
are termed "individual rights". A new fee structure and more stringent regulations 
together with a mechanism to fine violators has been developed into the Fire Department operating 
procedures. 

The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system. This system continues 
to expand as new complexes under construction are completed. At the present time forty-one members 
of the Andover Fire Department are nationally registered Emergency Medical Technicians. Sixteen of 
these are assigned to our ambulance. 

Both the Police and the Fire Department share Central Dispatch. This communication center receives 
calls for both public safety departments and dispatch vehicles and manpower to all emergency calls. 



fllg DEPARTMENT HI6HUCH15 

The decade of the 80's saw a great many changes in the Fire Department. The total manpower grew 
from 57 members to 67, and the office staff increased by one full-time position. The Department also 
hired its first minority and female firefighters during this period. The apparatus increased from nine 
pieces of equipment to fifteen, and the Department now maintains the policy of having two ambulances 
available at all times. 

In 1980, the Department utilized only 2 1/2" and 1/1/2" diameter hose and outdated-type turnout gear 
with no protective devices. During 1989 most of the hose was replaced with 3" and 1 3/4" diameter hose 
and all pumpers were equipped with self-contained foam tanks. The outdated firefighting turnout gear 
is being replaced with NFPA approved short coat style gear, and personal protective devices and helmet 
headlights are provided to each firefighter in the Department. 

In 1983, Central Dispatch, which initially came under the supervision of the Fire Department in 198 1 , 
was moved to the Police Department, where it receives and handles all emergency and business calls for 
both the Fire and Police Departments. With the inception of Central Dispatch, computerization began. 

All fire prevention records and reports, budgeting, purchases, personnel training and education, personnel 
attendance records and certification status will soon be computerized. 

Fire prevention activities have been greatly upgraded in the past decade, with a Deputy Chief now 
in a full-time day position which includes supervising activities of the office and reviewing plans and 
issuing permits in conjunction with the Building and Planning Divisions of the Department of Community 
Development and Planning. 



-17- 



Since 1986 every firefighter appointed has been required to attend and successfully complete a recruit 
training course at the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy. In addition, membership in professional fire 
organizations has been encouraged, and nearly all officers belong to at least one. Some of the 
Department's senior officers have attended, and are still periodically attending, classes at the National Fire 
Academy, and one of the Deputy Chiefs is a nationally-accredited arson investigator. Our emergency 
response staff has increased from 12 registered Emergency Medical Technicians in 1980 to 41 EMT's 
now. 

The following chart shows quite dramatically the increase in the activities of the Department during 
the past ten years. 



COMPARISON OF FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES OVER A 10 YEAR PERIOD 



FY-80 






FY-90 




Service Calls 


2490 


Service Calls 




5737 


Fires 


909 


Fires 




1608 


False Alarms 


196 


False Alarms 




704 


Mutual Aid Calls 


22 


Mutual Aid Calls 




40 


Value of Property where 




Value of Property where 




fire occurred 


$9,751,626 


fire occurred 




$43,926,992 


Fire Loss 


$ 131,347 


Fire Loss 




$ 1,254,221 


Ambulance Calls 


1102 


Ambulance Calls 




1459 


Medical Assist Calls 


45 


Medical Assist Calls 




230 


Mutual Aid Ambulance 


16 


Mutual Aid Ambulance 


290 


Ambulance Bills 


321 


Ambulance Bills 




1215 


Permits Issued 


296 


Permits Issued 




1173 


Fees Collected 


$ 317.50 


Fees Collected 




$10,760.00 


Ambulance Fees 


$9,630.00 


Ambulance Fees 




$96,000.00 



-18- 



HIS DEPAgMENT ACTIVITIES 

Service Calls 

Fires including both Structures & Vehicles 

False Alarms 

Accidental Alarms 

Fire Mutual Aid Calls to Other Communities 

Fire Mutual Aid Calls to Andover 

Approx. Value of Bldgs. or Vehicles where fires occurred 

Ambulance Calls 

Medical Assist Calls 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to Other Communities 

Ambulance Mutual Aid to Andover 

Fatalities from Fire 

Residents Billed for Ambulance Service 

Non-Residents Billed for Ambulance Service 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation Permits Issued 

Explosive Use Permits Issued 

Building Inspections Conducted 

Fire Drills Conducted 

Flammable Liquid Storage Permits Issued 

Liquified Petroleum Gas Permits Issued 

Cutting/Welding Permits Issued 

Rocketry Permits Issued 

26-F Smoke Detector Permits Issued 

26-B Smoke Detector Permits Issued 

Fire Alarm System Inspections Conducted 

Miscellaneous Permits Issued 

-19- 



1939 


198? 


5,737 


5,605 


1,608 


1,645 


63 


74 


641 


616 


37 


19 


3 


3 


$43,926,992 


$9,751,626 


1,459 


1,309 


230 


225 


126 


134 


164 


145 


-0- 


-0- 


664 


372 


551 


557 


119 


99 


9 


34 


608 


478 


137 


176 


19 


12 


25 


30 


15 


8 


2 


2 


544 


390 


366 


335 


649 


725 


74 


51 



sua Bgammr 

I certainly think it is appropriate to reminisce about the last ten years and the growth of the Andover 
Police Department. 

In the early part of 1980, my predecessor, Chief David L. Nicoll, retired in February after 42 years, 26 
of these years in the position of Police Chief. 

The total compliment of sworn personnel on the Department at the time was 41. During this period we 
also have seen the retirement of Captain Lloyd Belbin, Lt. Robert Parker, Sgt. Jacob Jacobson, Off. 
Lawrence Lynch, Off. William Atwood, Off. Roger Dufresne, Off. Gordon Douglass, Off. Richard 
Caldwell, Off. Robert Fanning, Off. Frank Donahue and Dorothy Volker, Secretary. 

The Town has certainly grown and so did our Department. Even though it is not at an ideal level, the 
50 sworn personnel officers have been able to handle the job. 

Of course, we could not have grown without much needed support front he high-tech industry. The 
installation of a combined Police, Fire and Ambulance Dispatch Center with the latest technology and 
state of the art radio communication certainly was needed and appreciated by members of the Department 
carrying out their assigned functions. 

The work load continued to increase and in the early 80 's the Department embarked on its first 
computerized records-keeping system. This certainly was a drastic change to the way police records were 
kept in the past. The system was very successful, and was replaced with a second generation system to 
include computer-aided dispatch and added programs to help compile data to disseminate in order to be 
more responsive to the type of incidents to which the Department responds to. 

Although the 80' s flew by, the Department decided to apply for Law Enforcement Accreditation during 
1986. On November 20, 1988, the Andover Police Department was awarded a Certificate of 
Accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. This was a 
gigantic endeavor and could not have been accomplished without the help and support of the whole 
department. 

The Police Department certainly could not have advanced in the 80' s without the help, understanding and 
support from the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen to make our Department one of the most 
respected in the State of Massachusetts. 

1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 



Total Incidents 


21,447 


22,310 


23,139 


21,561 


25,080 


Complaints 


5,936 


6,825 


7,526 


8,485 


9,251 


B&E 


279 


208 


185 


162 


278 


Larceny 


589 


541 


519 


581 


691 


Stolen Cars 


98 


120 


116 


127 


162 


Stolen Bicycles 


64 


33 


37 


43 


38 


MV Accidents 


1.499 


1,072 


1,393 


1,184 


1,216 


MV Fatalities 


3 


2 


4 


5 


5 


Vandalism 


305 


335 


353 


469 


368 


Parking Violations 


13,500 


15,000 


11,875 


13,380 


11,750 


MV Citations 


4,460 


5,046 


3,786 


3,782 


4,746 


Mileage 


375,836 


404,416 


366,910 


324,288 


364,737 


Gasoline 


43,752 


48,143 


51,646 


48,166 


51,280 



-20- 



PEIECI1VE DIVISION 

During 1989, the Andover Police Detective Division received use of a computer to help coordinate 
all records within the unit. Each investigation is recorded by incident number, suspect or accused, victim 
or reporting person, Officer responsible for the investigation and status of the investigation. All Booking 
photographs have been entered back to 1983 which greatly reduces search time if the information is 
needed. We have also entered a unique program to enter fingerprint information. This information will 
be helpful in searching latent fingerprints recovered at crime scenes. Detectives were assigned 472 
incidents to investigate and cleared 350 for a clearance rate of 74%. Total number of assigned 
investigations increased by 23% over 1988. 

Burglaries increased during 1989. In the first three months there was an increase in reported breaks 
in the southern side of Andover. After an intensive investigation, one suspect was charged and convicted 
with six counts of burglary. Breaks in the Downtown area also increased. After various investigations, 
six breaks were cleared and five suspects arrested. The Division also received complaints from elderly 
residents regarding missing items and prescription medication. After an investigation, a female employee 
at the complex involved, was arrested and charged with three counts of B&E and Larceny of Prescription 
Drugs. In total, the Detective Division cleared thirty-three cases of burglary in 1989. 

During the year, the Division investigated two bank robberies, the first occurred at the west Andover 
branch of the Andover Bank. The suspects entered the Bank with a sawed off rifle and fled with over 
$5,000 in cash. Within 15 hours, two youths were identified and arrested at Logan Airport just before 
a flight to Cancun, Mexico. All members of the Division were involved in the investigation. During 
April, the First Essex Bank on North Main Street was robbed by a masked male. Physical evidence was 
collected at the scene for examination. A chemical process developed a latent print from this evidence 
and a suspect identified. The suspect was arrested and convicted in Superior Court. 

The Juvenile Officer filed 42 Investigative Reports regarding juvenile offenses. The complaints 
included domestic problems.drug abuse, sexual assaults, runaways and other types of incidents, not 
included is the numerous contacts with residents regarding problems with juveniles. Most of these are 
referred to Social Agencies, School Guidance Counselors or settled by information and advice given at 
informal conference with the Juvenile Officer. 

The Detective Division attempted to locate latent fingerprints at 178 incidents that occurred within 
the Town. We also assisted area Towns with identifications when ever possible. We were able to clear 
41 various crimes by matching latent prints with suspects. Photographs were taken at 144 incidents 
within the Town. We also fingerprinted and photographed 113 suspects charged with felonies by the 
Andover Police Department. Over 100 residents requested fingerprints for jobs, adoptions, etc. We also 
processed over 300 residents for firearm permits of F.I.D. Cards. As a result of fraudulent check 
investigations, the Division recovered $6,000 for residents and businesses and have complaints or warrants 
pending in cases totaling over $31,000. 

BIB, DEFENSE 

The past ten years have been like a roller coaster for Civil Defense. The State has continues to erode 
away support services customarily dependent on by the cities and towns. 



-21- 



The Area Office for Massachusetts Civil Defense has been more than helpful to the Town even with their 
skeleton staff - the past ten years we have had floods, hazardous material accidents, a plane crash, and 
many preparations for pending storms (snow, hurricane, tornadoes), in which Massachusetts Civil Defense 
was always there offering their support. 

The most controversial activity during the past years was participation in the Seabrook Nuclear Power 
Plant Evaluation Plan- our assistance being a host community. In the mid 80's,this plan was stopped by 
the Town due to the State's refusal to be involved; their belief there was not a workable plan. 

The most recent involvement of interaction between the State and Local communities through Civil 
Defense is in the New Hazardous Materials Laws, referred to as "SARA TITLE THREE", gave authority 
to civil defense to coordinate compliance by the communities. 

In the Town of Andover, the Health Director, Everett Penney, was made Chairman of the local 
committee made up of Department Heads. This was a monumental task, and as usual, all departments 
helped tremendously. We accomplished our goal, with the Town receiving recognition that they had one 
of the better plans. 

During the past year, our volunteers, both in the Auxiliary Police and the Communication Unit, 
donated many hours supporting different departments in Town and private groups, (ex. parades, patrols, 
public buildings, and land). The Town is certainly fortunate to be blessed with these civic-minded 
volunteers, who give of themselves so freely. I thank them all for they will never really know how much 
they are really appreciated. 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER'S RffORT FOR 1989 

Lost Dogs 113 

Dogs Found 64 

Dog Complaints 869 

Dead Dogs picked up 8 

Money Collected $2,010.00 

Administrative Fees 1,959.00 

Dogs Sold (17) 57.00 

Impounded Cats 46 

Dead cats picked up 43 

Impounded Dogs 152 

Various dead animals picked up 371 

Number of Citations issued 45 

Total Number of Calls answered 2,239 

Amount of Gas 1,293.6 

Amount of Mileage 1 1,553.2 

PRO BONO WORK PROGRAM hours 



-22- 



GAME WARDEN 

The Constable Game Wardens of Andover put in about 2000 hours of patrolling during the year 1989. 
Town land, Avis land and Conservation land were covered. During the hunting and fishing season 
activities were about normal. The Shawsheen River was stocked with a good amount of fish from the 
State Hatcheries. The fishing derby at Hussey's Pond was well attended and some nice trout were caught 
by the youngsters. 

There was a heavy population of deer in the area this year and there were five known road kills. A 
pair of Moose were roaming around the southern part of town for a couple of days. One of them was 
killed by a car driven by an Andover resident on Route 114. Fortunately, the individual was not hurt 
in the accident. 

As in the past, the Town Wardens assisted the State in monitoring the activity in the Harold Parker 
State Forest during the hunting season. Hunters harvested six deer during the 10 day season. We had 
one beaver problem at the intake of Hussey's Pond backing water up to Canterbury Street and into some 
backyards. The dam was continually monitored and removed with State permission to allow the water 
to recede. Repeated efforts to trap the beaver and remove them has failed so far. 

We also assisted the Animal Control Officer at different times whenever he requested it. 

During the colder weather we inspected the skating areas and warned people when we thought the 
conditions were not safe. 

We also wish to thank Chief Johnson for his assistance and equipment supplied. 

IHMUIBBHMM 

The following is a statistical report of the activities of the Inspector of Animals for the calendar year 
1989: 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 27 

Number of Animals tested for Rabies 3 

Number of Barns inspected 31 

Number of Beef Calves under one year 21 

Number of Beef Heifers 3 

Number of Beef Steers 18 

Number of Beef Herds (one constitutes a herd) 3 

Number of donkeys 3 

Number of Horses (includes work and saddle horses 80 

Number of Ponies 32 

Number of Goats 6 

Number of Sheep 1 

Number of Swine 77 

Number of Swine Herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 2 



-23- 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Department offers year round recreational, enrichment and cultural programs for residents of all 
ages. The majority of the programs are held at the public schools, Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, Central 
Park and other in-town facilities. 

Program booklets are mailed to all resident households in January, June and September. Booklets 
were restructured to a full length 8 1/2" x 11" size and are reproduced in-house as camera-ready on the 
Department's computer. The new format offers concise information, youth programs incorporating 
pre-Kindergarten through high school, a section highlighting DCS instructors and, includes multiple mail 
in registration forms for easier sign up. DCS staff continues to integrate Macintosh into all program 
information and financial reports. 

Department sponsored trips were popular this year and included four sold out trips to the Ramesses 
exhibit at the Boston Museum of Science and two sold out buses to the Big Apple Circus which was 
co-sponsored by the Stephen's Foundation. Morning activities for the Fourth of July Celebration were 
reorganized. The Committee For Patriotic Observances paid for playground supervisors' salaries and 
prizes for the scheduled events. A large savings was realized by utilizing town resources and by the 
discontinuation of a carnival vendor. 

The Gymnastic Meet and the Bradford Ski Program continue to be the most popular programs at the 
elementary and middle school levels. Club Soda, a dance comedy night offered inconj unction with the 
Community ASK Team, continues to be a hit with the high school students. The Department works 
closely with the school principals, health and physical education personnel to organize these events and 
maintain their popularity and success. 

Summer playground programs were offered at all four elementary schools. Shee-Hee and Shaw-Nee 
(pre-school) programs continued at Shawsheen; Ha-Kow-Wee (all day) was again held at Rec Park Pomps 
Pond. 

The non-resident fee of $3.00 per person worked well this summer at the pond. Restricted use of 
the pond positively effected the area from a maintenance, vandalism and guarding stand point. Andover 
pond patrons were pleased with the policy. The Haunted House was especially popular this year drawing 
record breaking crowds.. FY89 was the biggest year for the "Mitten Tree". Over 1,000 towns people 
participated in the drive to collect mittens, hats and scarfs for local shelters. 

Community Services is thankful for all the volunteer support it received this year and looks forward 
to providing quality leisure time activities and services to all residents of Andover. 

The following are the particular numbers for FY89: 



Classes 


3,417 


Drop-In Playground 


347 


In-Town Events 


2,663 


Shee-Hee Playground 


143 


Trips 


1,331 


Shaw-Nee Playground 


96 


Movies 


1,200 


Ha-Kow-Wee-Playground 


137 


Concerts 


1,800 


Swimming Lessons 


101 


Open Gyms 


830 


Leagues 


590 


Mitten Tree 


1,000 







-24- 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Due to the availability of Meals on Wheels, Lifeguard, (a personal emergency response system) and 
the Outreach Coordinator at the Senior Center, many more requests are being received and addressed to 
serve Andover's sixty and over population. 

A Grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of the Executive Office of Elder 
Affairs, was awarded in December which will allow for the purchase of new equipment for the kitchen 
to allow us to serve more residents, comfortable chairs for those Seniors who attend the film series twice 
a week, the Armchair Travel Series and lecture type programs held at the Senior Center. The Grant also 
provides funds for a monthly lecture at the Diabetes Support Group now in planning. 

The Meals on Wheels program expanded to seven days in February offering special diets by June. 
The regular weekday meals continue to be prepared in the Senior Center Kitchen. Academy Manor 
Nursing Home prepares all special diets, weekend and holiday meals. The number of meals delivered 
on this program was 9,311. 

The Senior Citizen's Lunch Program served 10,780 meals at the Senior Center and 6,040 Meals on 
Wheels were prepared at this facility. Academy Manor prepared 3,271 Meals on Wheels. 

The Alzheimer and Parkinson's Support Groups continue to grow showing evidence of their value. 

The Volunteer Program has expanded rapidly during the last few months from Volunteers who help 
at the desk, assist with many programs, raise monies through crafts, to the Friendly Visitor Program. 
The Volunteer Program is not only a definite help at the Center, it provides and opportunity for our 
seniors to contribute their energy and time at a period in their lives when they need to feel they are 
making a difference. 

The Third Annual Council on Aging Golf Tournament raised six thousand dollars. This money is 
used to purchase lifeguard equipment and to support programs such as Alzheimers's Support Groups. 

Community and civic leaders continue to show their support for the Council on Aging. The Fourth 
Annual Golf Tournament will be held at the Haverhill Country Club in October and we are anticipating 
another success. 

The Spring Fashion Show, sponsored by the Council on Aging/ Andover Haven Associates, is being 
held at the Old Town Hall on April 8 to support the "Senior Prom" at the Andover Marriott in May. 

A drop-in center will open soon at the Old Town Hall as an extension of the Senior Center. The 
purpose being that seniors will be able to stop by for a cup of coffee and socialization while shopping 
downtown. The furnishings are being donated and the drop-in center will open as soon as the furniture 
is in place. The room will be staffed by volunteers with occasional participation by the Outreach and 
Volunteer Coordinators from this office. 

The Merrimack Valley Transit Authority provides transportation for Andover residents. Weebus 
service provided 1 1 ,677 passenger trips, the Andover Downtown Shuttle carried 3 1 ,575 passengers and 
434 rides were provided through the Dial-a-ride Program. Figures for 1989 were only available through 
October. 

Several new classes have been developed at the Senior Center for 1990. Once more, user's fees 
cover the cost of instructors and supplies. This system of fees is applied to Adult Day Care and Meals 
on Wheels with the same results. Therefore, it is expected the cutbacks in State and Federal Funding for 
older Americans's programs will have very little effect t)n services and programs at the Senior Center. 



-25- 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 

The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Technical School is prepared each year in conformity 
with the terms of the Agreement to Establish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating 
communities in the Region are the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover and, North Andover and 
Methuen. The content of the Annual Report under the terms of the Agreement is to contain a detailed 
financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year. Further, it is required that for 
each budget period there be included a statement showing the method by which the annual charges 
assessed to each member community were computed. Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, 
the Regional School Committee may add such additional information relating to the operation and 
maintenance of the school deemed necessary or appropriate. 

Following a policy adopted when the school was initially built, the school has been made available 
to organizations within the region who desire to use many of the school's varied facilities. During the 
school year, 1988-89, over 70 organizations used the facilities for a total of over 3,800 
hours. 

COURSES AVAILABLE FOR REGULAR DAY STUDENTS (1988-89) 



Air Conditioning 


Graphic Communications Technology 


Auto Body 


Heavy Equipment 


Automotive 


Health Services 


Carpentry 


Home Management 


Clothing Arts & Design 


Machine Shop 


Cosmetology 


Major Appliance Repair 


Culinary Arts 


Metal Fabrication & Welding 


Data Management 


Painting & Decorating 


Distributive Education 


Pipefitting & Plumbing 


Drafting 


Plant Maintenance 


Electrical 


Radio-TV & Industrial 


Electronics 


Small Engine Repair 




Upholstery 


PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES - SCHOOL YEAR 1988-89 



NEW CO-OP 
AGREEMENTS 

9 
3 
1 
4 
4 
35 

As of graduation day in June, 1989, over 96% of the senior class had received employment. The 
business firms with Cooperative Work Agreements with the school numbered 1705, an increase of 56 
companies within one year. 



-26- 





STUDENTS 


PERCENT OF 




EMPLOYED 


SENIOR CLASS 


October 


172 


74% 


December 


193 


79% 


January 


196 


81% 


February 


204 


85% 


March 


205 


86% 


June 


240 


96% 



APPROVED BUDGET 
- PY 1990 - 

(1ITIID) 



J1IUUY 24, 1919 



1000 



GEIIUL 





KZPSISE Of iistiuctioi 




2000 


oat school 


$5,217,596.00 




SPECIAL ID0C1TI0I 


$306,404.00 


3000 


AUIILI11Y 1GUCIIS 




3350 


COST OP TlilSPOtTlTIOl 




1100 


0PS1ATI0I OP PLAIT 




4200 


UIITIIIICI OP PLilT 




5000 


SPECIAL CUIUS 




6000 


IISCILLinOUS 




7000 


0UTL1T 




1000 


out mumr? 





Ptsdi for Inaction 

PUPIL THIS CI 71, 1 16C 
SCHOOL P10C TlilS CI 71,711,711,7 74 
SCHOOL ILK ASSIST CI 645, 511 
1KI0I1L SCHOOL AID CI 71, 16D 
TUITIOI STAT1 IUDS CI76, SS7, 9, CI 74 
SCHOOL 110 CI 70 

otid puns 



■IT TOTAL 



$466,467.00 
5,524,000.00 



429,912.00 
571,093.00 
113,371.00 
525,620.00 
120,172.00 
411,122.00 
294,091.00 
170,000.00 

$10,103,555.00 



575,946.00 

3,670.00 

214,911.00 

1,111,437.00 

17,111.00 

3,199,246.00 

100,000.00 

$6,699,461.00 

$3,404,087.00 



AIDOTIt 

LAIIEICE 
IKTHUII 

10. AJD0YE1 



tun 

STUDHT 
POPUL1TIOI 1UCUST 1 



IUDCIT SHUI POl KICH IUIICIP1LITT 
DICIIIII 1 1PIIL 1 JUIH 1 



I CHAJGE 
T0T1L Pimn 0711 PTI9 



0.026 


22,126.50 


22,126.50 


22,126.50 


22,126.50 


11,506.00 


(26.1) 


0.725 


616,990.75 


616,990.75 


616,990.75 


616,990.75 


2,467,963.00 


24.0 


0.207 


176,161.50 


176,161.50 


176,161.50 


176,161.50 


704,646.00 


2.6 


0.042 


35,743.00 


35,743.00 


35,743.00 


35,743.00 


142,972.00 


13. S 



1.000 $151,021.75 $151,021.75 $151,021.75 $151,021.75 $3,404,017.00 



16.5 



S3S3333S3333333222333SS333333333333S333333Z22ZZZ3SS 



:S3Z3Z333ZZZ22222222222223S332: 



:::::::::: 



PT90 - 1.1.0.6. ESTIMATED IITHUIS: $553 , 813.00 
(MUST II USED POl 1DDITIOI1L IIST1UCTIOI1L IXPITDITU1IS; 

CAI IOT II USED IS "PUIDS POl IIDUCTIOI.') 



-27- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31 . 1989 

PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 



BOOK VALUE MARKET VALUE 



$ 16.605.72 $ 



16.605.72 



MUTUAL FUND 

3275 SHARES COMSTOCK PARTNERS STRATEGY FUND 



$ 32,670.86 $ 



33,978.12 



SECURITIES 
STOCK 












300 SHARES BANK OF BOSTON 
300 " BAXTER INT'L INC. 
1000 " DUFF & PHELPS SEL UTILITIES 
400 ■ MCDONALDS CORP. 
300 " SERVICEMASTER LTD. 
200 " SEARS & ROEBUCK 




$ 


10.462.50 

6,712.50 

10,000.00 

1 1 .300.00 

6,900.00 

8,575.00 


$ 
$ 


5,700.00 
7,500.00 
8.500.00 
13,800.00 
6,450.00 
7,625.00 


TOTAL STOCK 


$ 


53,950.00 


49,575.00 


OTHER 












$15,000 U.S.TREASURY NOTE, 
$35,000 U.S. TREASURY NOTE. 
$1 9.646 GSIF G GNMA SERIES 


DUE 2/15/98 
DUE 8/15/98 


$ 


14,680.58 

14,196.35 

6,015.81 


$ 


15,059.65 

17,675.00 

5,697.34 


TOTAL OTHER 




$ 


34,892.74 


$ 


38,431.99 


TOTAL SECURITIES 




$ 


88,842.74 


$ 


88,006.99 


RESERVE-LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 




$ 

= = 


0.00 
138,119.32 


$ 




TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 


_238_,590_83 




RESERVE FUND 








RESERVE CASH 

ANDOVER SAVINGS BANK PRIME ACCOUNT (749-700150) 
PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 


$ 


3,845.11 
7,832.70 







TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



11,677.81 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT 

BAY BANK/MERRIMACK VALLEY 



1,715.07 



TOTAL FUNDS 



$ 151,512.20 



-28- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER.MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,1989 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 
J.W.BARNARD 
ALICE M.BELL 
EDNA O.CHAPIN 
FRED W.DOYLE 
WARREN F. DRAPER 
WILLIAM O.GOLDSMITH 
ELIZABETH T.OUTTERSON 
MYRON E.OUTTERSON 
ANDOVER GRANGE 
PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 
RESERVE-COST OR MKT. 



BALANCE 


SCHOLARSHIP 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 


1/1/89 


ESTABLISHED 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/89 


3.206.70 $ 




$ 210.91 $ 


3,417.61 $ 


175.00 


S 3,242.61 


6. 146. IS 




404.25 


6,550.43 




6,550.43 


1,043.66 




68.64 


1,112.30 


85.00 


1,027.30 


2,400.78 




157.91 


2,558.69 


200.00 


2,358.69 


12,759.45 




905.00 


13,664.45 


0.00 


-A) 13,664.45 


1,565.71 




102.98 


1,668.69 


130.00 


1.538.69 


1,565.17 




102.95 


1,668.12 




1.668.12 


1,043.65 




68.64 


1,112.29 


85.00 


1.027.29 


992.55 




65.28 


1,057.83 


28.50 


1,029.33 


2.750.80 




180.93 


2,931.73 


200.00 


2,731.73 


0.00 


10,000.00 


670.81 


10,670.81 




10,670.81 


(1,937.50) 




1,937.50 


0.00 




0.00 


31.537.15 $ 


10,000.00 


$ 4,875.80 $ 


46,412.95 


903.50 


$ 45,509.45 



SUMMARY-INCOME/(EXPENSE) 



INTEREST INCOME ! 

DIVIDEND INCOME 

GAIN ON SALE OF SECURITES 

BROKERAGE FEES 

SERVICE CHARGE-MERRILL LYNCH 

INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 

ADJ. TO LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 

NET INCOME ! 



2.609.90 
365.00 
387.50 
(255.10) 
(125.00) 
(44.00) 
1,937.50 

4,875.80 



FUNDS HELD 

PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

200 SHARES BRISTOL MYERS 

100 SHARES DUN & BRADSTREET CORP. 

(1) CERTIFICATE OF DEPOSIT-ANDOVER BANK 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST OR MARKET 



(A- 1989 SCHOLARSHIP AWARD OF $1000 WAS OFFSET 
BY REFUND IN 1989 FOR LOST CHECK FOUND AND 
INADVERTENTLY CASHED BY COLLEGE IN 1988. 



MARKET 




BOOK 


VALUE 


S 


VALUE 


20,104.64 


20.104.64 


11,200.00 




10.700.00 


4,600.00 




4,262.50 


10,442.31 




10.442.31 




$ 


0.00 


46,346.95 


45,509.45 



-29- 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVERXASSACHUSETTS 

STATMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1989 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



1/1/89 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



COMSTOCK FUND 

MERRILL LYNCH MGT.ACCT. 

SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 



RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 
COST OR MARKET 



$ 31,488. 12 -GAIN ON SALE OF SECURrriES 

19.042.37 -BROKERAGE FEES 

92.727.38 -INVESTMENT COUNSEL FEE 
-TRANSFER TO SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
-10* OF ANNUAL INCOME(l/l-12/31/89) 
-TRANSFER FROM RESERVE FUND 

(10,602.50) -ADJUSTMENT TO COST/MARKET RESERVE 



$ 132,655.37 



INCREASE 



1,249.86 COMSTOCK FUND S 

(632.41) PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 

(242.00) SECURITIES AT BOOK VALUE 
(10,000.00) 
925.00 

3,561.00 RESERVE FOR LOWER OF 

10,602.50 COST OR MARKET 

5,463.95 S 



12/31/89 

32,670.86 
16,605.72 
88.842.74 



0.0O 
138.1 19.32 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS 
CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 
MERRILL LYNCH MGT.ACCT. 



3,611.65 
1,529.23 
8,500.41 

13,641.29 



INCOME 

DIVIDENDS RECEIVED 
INTEREST RECEIVED 



INCOME TOTAL 



CASH IN BANK-SAVINGS S 3.845.11 

4,187.15 CASH IN BANK-CHECKING 1.715.07 

5,067.74 PAINE WEBBER CASH FUND 7.832.70 

9,254.89 S 13.392.88 



EXPENSES 



ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL PROJECTS 


$ 


4,509.04 


MISC. OPERATING EXPENSES 




383.26 


SERVICE CHARGE-MERRILL LYNCH 




125.00 


EXPENSE TOTAL 


$ 


5,017.30 


NET GAIN 


S 


4,237.59 


TRANSFERS TO PRINCIPAL: 






-10% OF INCOME OME 




925.00 


-UNEXPENDED SCHOOL PROJECT FUNDS 
(7/1/88 - 6/30/89) 




3,561.00 


DECREASE 


$ 


(248.41) 



$ 146.296.66 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



151,512.20 



-30- 



ACCOUNTING AND RETIREMENT 



■ Received designation of "Certified Governmental Accountant" from the Ma Municipal Auditor's and 
Accountant's Association. June 1985. 

■ Converted from "Statutory Accounting System" to the "UMAS Accounting System" Enables town to 
report financial data on a fund basis, and simplifies conversion at end of year to GAAP accounting. 

■ Obtained the services of a Professional Money Manager and Custodial Services for the Retirement 
System to manage its investment portfolio. Obtained full investment waiver from PERA for increased 
flexibility in investments. 

■ Through town appropriations and aggressive retirement earnings, the retirement has generated a fund 
in excess of $4.5 million to reduce its actuarially determined unfunded liability. 

■ Substantially computerized town's financial records and retirement records. 

1 . Worked directly with outside consultants to develop a computerized fund general ledger system. 
This was done with no cost to the town as this office volunteered its time to assist these outside 
programmers developing the general ledge package. 

2. Computerized the Retirement Systems membership and financial information. 

ANPWK HISTOgl«l COMMISSION 

The Andover Historical Commission, organized in 1970 by Town Meeting vote, has its major mission 
to act as an advisory group in securing and preserving the historic, architectural and cultural resources 
of our community. 

In response to the 1989 Town Meeting mandate to develop a master plan, the Commission has worked 
with the Planning Department to reaffirm its dedication to the Commission's 1990 comprehensive 
preservation plan. To support these objectives the Commission voted to concentrate its efforts on these 
specific steps: 

- Promote heritage education in the community 

- Establish local historic districts 

- Update the inventory of historic properties 

- Develop working relationships with the Planning Department, Building Inspector, Conservation 
Commission and Design Review Board 

- Propose demolition-delay strategies 

- Seek funding resources for historic rehabilitation 

- Establish an historic marker program 

- Encourage a cooperative exchange of ideas and resources among various community groups and 
individuals interested in the continued preservation Andover 's historic properties 

- Initiate preservation awards within the community 



-31- 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

The Department of Municipal Maintenance was created in 1983 from various other entities and 
personnel of other departments. Presently the department consists of five divisions: Administration; 
Building Maintenance; Plumbing, Heating & Electrical; Parks and Grounds and Vehicle Maintenance. 

Administration 

The administration staff consists of the Director, Secretary, Account Clerk, Telecommunications 
Coordinator (part-time), and two part-time wVReceptionist/Switchboard Operators. 

The department is now computerized for work orders, preventive maintenance, vehicle inventory, 
vehicle maintenance and word processing for the many bid specifications required. We are in the process 
of installing new vehicle fuel tanks at one central location that will be computer card-controlled. This 

will enable the department to remove eight old underground fuel tanks that do not comply with the new 
underground storage regulations and save $4,800 per year in testing costs. 

An old house at 9 Pearson Street was torn down and a new road constructed to allow for easier access 
and exit from the Town Yard located at the foot of Lewis Street. Major capital 
improvements were completed one the High School roof, tennis courts, asbestos removal at various 
schools, a new road at the West Elementary School and repaving at Sanborn School. 

Building Maintenance Division 

When the Municipal Maintenance Department was established six years ago, the department's 
personnel disassembled the Theater Building before it was demolished and they have completed additional 
projects: 

1. A shop for the Municipal Maintenance Department was built on Red Spring Road. Much of this shop 
was built with he remains of the demolished Theater Building. 

2. Shawsheen School was completely renovated to be used for school occupancy again. 

3. A new garage and office were built at the Spring Grove Cemetery. 

4. The new Town Offices building was established and maintenance personnel coordinated the move of 
the offices from the Theater Building, the old Town Hall and the Shawsheen School to the new offices. 

5. All elementary schools and middle schools have had new roofs installed, and the high school roof at 
present is two-thirds completed. 

6. Doors and Hardware - Numerous exterior doors have been installed throughout the school system in 
order to provide better security and safer operation. 

7. Gates - Pipe gates have been set up at Pomps Pond, the Recreation Park and conservation areas 
throughout the town. 



-32- 



8. Bleachers - At Lovely Field all wooden bleacher seats were replaced with aluminum seats. 

9. Drapes - All drapes at the high school were replaced with new vertical blinds. Many shades and 
vertical blinds were installed in the schools. This is an ongoing project. 

10. Painting - All schools (corridors, classrooms, gyms, and cafeterias) have been painted. Exterior 
doors and windows of most of the schools have also been scraped and painted. 

11. The exterior masonry walls of the Shawsheen and Bancroft Schools were siliconed to prevent water 
seepage. 

12. Playground equipment has been installed throughout the Town recreational facilities and school 
playgrounds. 

Unless an emergency situation arises, the daily operational needs of the schools and town buildings 
are served on a priority 

by the Building Maintenance personnel who play a vital part in the maintenance of all the town-owned 
structures. 

Park mi bmk Diraion 

Prior to 1983, Park, Cemetery, and Forestry existed as three separate divisions within the Department 
of Public Works. Upon the formation of the Department of Municipal Maintenance on February 1 , 1983, 
the three divisions came under the direction of one superintendent within the new department. Although 
the divisions always worked cooperatively under the old structure, the new structure allowed for central 
direction, better and more coordinated sharing of equipment and personnel, and the accomplishment of 
routine tasks and special projects in concert and in sequence. 

While there was some shifting of personnel and duties during the 1980's, the total strength of the 
divisions grew by only one employee during the decade. At the present time, the Parks and Grounds 
Division consists of: one Superintendent with overall responsibility for the three divisions, a General 
Foreman and eight workers in the Park division, a Working Foreman and three tree trimmers in the 
Forestry Division, and a Supervisor and three workers at the Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Spring Grove Cemetery saw gradual growth during the Eighties, built one new road, and opened two 
new sections for the sale of lots and burials. At present time, a larger section, approximately 50,000 
square feet, is being cleared for future use. In August, 1987, the old office near the Spring Grove Road 
gate was destroyed by fire; duplicate records stored elsewhere assured the continuity of operations. 
Restoration of records prompted the conversion to computerized cemetery records. A new office and 
garage, under construction at the time of the fire, has been completed and is fully operational. The added 
storage space allowed the demolition of the old, small barn near the Abbot Street gate. Although one 
employee was a transfer from the DPW's Water Division, the 1980' saw a 100% turnover in cemetery 
personnel. 

Cemetery personnel and equipment worked singly and in conjunction with other divisions on 
constructions sites at existing building, at new buildings under construction, at drainage sites, ballfields, 
playgrounds, schools and recreational areas. Added duties both in and out of Spring Grove were 



-33- 



accomplished with a limited number of personnel by means of better personnel utilization and improved 
methods and equipment. 

The Forestry division, with fewer personnel than at the start of the Eighties, kept up with its principal 
function of maintaining roadside public shade trees (planting, pruning, and removal). Starting in February 
of 1983, Forestry took on the responsibilities for all trees on school and trees on conservation land that 
posed problems for abutting private property owners. In spite of the addition of new responsibilities, new 
areas such as Andover Town Offices and new parking lots, and many new miles of public roads, the 
division kept pace due to improved equipment and methods. During the 1980's, there was a 50% 
turnover among the Forestry personnel. Among the special projects accomplished by Forestry were 
fencing at the Ballardvale Green and the parking lot on Chandler Road, whiskey barrel planters in the 
central business district, and work on the Street of Memorial Flags. The Park Division saw the only gain 
in personnel in the Eighties, but also saw the greatest increase in responsibilities and total areas to be 
maintained. During the decade, a ball field complex was added on Chandler Road (the Buster Deyermond 
Field) and ballfields were expanded at the high school, the two middle schools, and Recreation Park. 
There was a total of twenty-two school and municipal sites, e.g Doherty Middle School and the Water 
Filtration Plant, added to the lawn and landscape ares to be maintained by the division during the 1980's. 
During the decade, the division managed to maintain and improve the areas for which it is responsible 
due to the improved utilization of manpower and improved equipment. During the 1980's, there was an 
80% turnover in Park Division personnel. 

Among the major improvements in which the division participated were the construction of a new 
road at West Elementary, reconstruction of the Andover High tennis courts, asphalt paving at elementary 
schools, reconstruction of a soccer filed and a field hockey field at the High School, reconstruction of the 
Ballardvale Green, sodding the lawn of the Collins Center, a majority of the work in building the 
Deyermond Field, and the installation of benches and trash receptacles in town. 

fjm&m, Heating & Hedriol Dwirim 

PHE - this section was started on July 1, 1983, using a nucleus of four (4) men from the Andover 
School Department where their responsibility was predominantly HVAC. 

With the additional man power, a broader encompassment of areas of responsibility such as lighting 
(power), heating, and plumbing were added into this section. Licensed technicians became a requirement 
under this broad scope. Outside contractors were used in addition, to enable us to service all the 
additional Town facilities as well. 

Work order procedures concerning emergency, routine, and preventive maintenance were initiated 
allowing us to perform the maintenance requirements for the Town of Andover Physical Plant. 

It became apparent that immediate, and future needs in the Physical Plant should be attended to more 
emphatically. Future needs were in these categories: replacement of obsolete 

equipment, repair of existing equipment, installation of energy-saving equipment. Capital outlays were 
used for these specific areas constituting considerable savings in heating and 
energy savings. 



-34- 



Some of the changes that were made over the years were as follows: 



1. Computer-operated heating systems. 

2. Lighting, changes - installation of energy-saving lighting and timing devices. 

3. Installation of new fuel-burning equipment. 

4. Installation of new boilers. 

5. Installation of more efficient heat-recovery return systems. 

To keep ahead of the ever increasing cost of energy, a continued effort in these areas must be adhered 



to. 



Vehicle Hawtenence Diwien 

Vehicle Maintenance was organized July 1 , 1983, removing the responsibility of maintaining vehicles 
from the Highway, Police and Fire Departments. Forming under the Vehicle Maintenance section, the 
responsibility for maintaining, purchasing, and allocation of motor vehicles for the Town of Andover. 

Uniformity of specifications for the purchase of new equipment was instituted as were work order 
procedures and follow-up preventive maintenance procedures. 

Some of the changes were as follows: 

1. The addition of two (2) mechanics. 

2. The purchase, training and use of testing equipment for greater performance and efficiency of 

motor vehicles. 

3. Less use of outside contractors for the repair of Town Vehicles. 

Continued effort in these areas will result inconsiderable savings and down-town of Town motor 
vehicles. 



-35- 



public mm 



Engineering 

Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive bids, field layouts and construction 
supervision were provided for the following projects: 

- Bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on Andover Street and Clark Road. 

- Surface water drainage Greenwood Road, River Street, Andover Street. 

- Water main, Glenwood Road extension through bidding, construction to take place in the spring. 

- Sewer, North Street to Webster Street through bidding, construction in spring. 

- Water mains for Webster Street through to River Road and High Plain Road have been designed. 

A great deal of time was spent this year on the following Town of Andover projects: 

- Hammond Way construction was completed after bond default. 

- Estimated sewer Betterments for the West Parish Acres sewer project and the North Street Extension. 

- West Elementary School roadway to the back parking lot. 

- SHED building site plan and utility layout. 

- York Street — Haverhill Street roadway improvements, Central Street, Stevens Street Bridge 
rehabilitation and Lowell Street - Haggetts Pond Road traffic lights designated by consultants. 

For the Planning Board, preliminary and/or definitive plans for 1 1 subdivisions of land with a total of 
63 lots were reviewed to determine conformance with its rules and regulations and to ascertain the 
adequacy of the proposed utilities. The necessary performance bond amounts were figured where needed 
and filed inspections of subdivisions under construction were carried out. Legal description for roadway 
layouts and easements were checked before they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the projects outlined above 
and for other proposed projects. Federal and State government agencies were consulted on engineering 
matters, principally concerning Chapter 90 construction, sewer main extensions and State Highway 
projects. 

Many Town residents and others were assisted in obtaining information about existing utilities, street 
layouts, industrial and residential sites and other general information. The engineering records of the 
Town were maintained and updated and other Town Departments were aided in obtaining information. 
The Engineering Division updates the Town Assessor's maps and prints the necessary copies for the Town 



-36- 



Departments. Street Opening permits for the installation and repair of underground utilities were issued 

through this division and the inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division of Public Works consists of four employees. 

flMPtkJMtMjMBS 

Engineering now updates the Assessor's maps, tabulates changes, drafts the changes and prints copies for 
various departments. 

titm 

During 1989, six streets were stone sealed with stone-chips and asphalt for a total of approximately 3.80 
miles. Sixteen street were resurfaced with a bituminous concrete for a total of 6.63 miles 

Also, twelve streets were "crack-filled" with an asphalt emulsion treatment for a total of 6.33 miles. 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleaning of all streets after 
winter sanding. Both sweepers start each morning at 5:00 a.m. The Highway Division assists the 
Engineering Division in its inspection of the conditions of new street before they are accepted as public 
ways. The Highway Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 

857 catchbasins and 14 storm drains were cleaned and kept free of all debris, and all Town brooks were 
also cleaned and maintained. Some 48 catchbasins and 1 storm drain were repaired because of 
deterioration and damage caused by frost and icy conditions during the winter season. The Highway 
Division, with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of the Public Works Department and the 
Department of Municipal Maintenance, is also responsible for snow removal and ice control, including 
flood control for all Town roads. 

The Town, under contract, collected 12,341 tons of residential refuse. Andover, being a member of the 
North East Solid Waste Committee (NESWC), has its refuse transported and processed at the Regional 
Waste-to-energy Plant in North Andover. 

Water 

The Water Division consists of 17 full-time employees and is responsible for the meter reading, supply, 
treatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The major components of the water 
system are as follows: Supply - Haggerts Pond, Fish Brook, Merrimack River, Abbot Well; Treatment 
- Water Treatment Plant; Chlorination Facilities - Fish Brook; Pumping Stations - Water Treatment Plant, 
Fish Brook, Bancroft Reservoir, Prospect Hill and Wood Hill. The Water Treatment Plant has recently 
undergone an expansion to increase capacity from 12 MGD to 24 MGD and has added an Ozone 
Treatment facility. Distribution Mains - 181 miles and 9,149 connections. 

The total water pumped to the system from January 1, 1989, through December 31, 1989, was 
1,755,974,000 gallons. The average daily pumping was 4,810,888 gallons, with a maximum day of 
8,766,000 gallons occurring on July 27, 1989. 



-37- 



Hydrants Repaired 44 

Hydrants Replaced 6 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 1 1 

House Service Leaks Repaired 7 

House Services Renewed 6 

Water Main Taps 8 

New Water Meters Installed 74 

Old Water Meters Replaced 151 

Water Meters Repaired 16 



Sewer 



The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations 
on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path Road, West Elementary School, Shawsheen Village, and the 
entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 64 miles of sanitary sewers and 4,595 connections. In the past year, the 
division freed 29 blockages in sewer mains, rodded 28 mains, repaired 1, and answered 29 private sewer 
problems. The Shawsheen Village Pumping Station discharges by means of a force main through the City 
of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge from Shawsheen Village Pumping 
Station Pumping Station is collected and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. 



GREATER UKKBSt MfflB DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District Wastewater Treatment Facility continued to provide service to 
residential, commercial and industrial users in 1989. Since its initial operation in April 1977, the facility 
has treated 100 billion gallons of wastewater that was being discharged, untreated, into the Merrimack 
River. 

In 1989, Andover's share of the flow at the plant was 3.426 million gallons per day. 

The plant is currently staffed by 72 people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per day and 365 days 
per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



-38= 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PUNNING 
Pbiminj Board 

During 1989 the Planning Board held twenty-three meetings. Eleven Definitive Subdivision Plans 
were submitted with filing fees totalling $30,550.00; eight plans were granted approval and three plans 
were withdrawn without prejudice, creating a total of thirty-nine new residential lots. Three requests for 
modification to restrictions of previously approved Definitive Subdivision Plans were submitted; all were 
approved. Eleven Preliminary Plans were submitted; the Board approved four of these plans. 
Thirty-seven subdivision plans not requiring formal Planning Board approval involving $1 ,525,00 in filing 
fees were certified involving twenty-four lots. Six subdivision performance guarantees totaling 
$264,940.00 were secured from developers. Eight site plan reviews were conducted by the Planning 
Board. The Planning Board reported on fifty-three Warrant Articles for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 
A Housing Subcommittee was established by the Planning Board to update the 1983-84 Housing Plan. 
A Community Development Action Grant (CDAG-totalling $765,000 was awarded to the Town for 
improvements in Shawsheen Village including street work on York Street and traffic signal improvements. 
The CDAG is being administered by Planning Board Staff. The Planning Board processed 26 proposals 
for street acceptance for the 1989 Town Meeting and 12 of those were accepted as public ways. 

mam dmsion 

The Building Inspection Division is charged with the enforcement of the Massachusetts State Building 
code and the local zoning bylaw to do inspections, issue building permits and to ensure public safety. 

BuiMrif , hgtjfil 

The purpose of the local zoning bylaw is to promote the health, safety, convenience, morals and 
general welfare of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover. The intent is to secure safety from fire, 
flood, panic and other dangers, to prevent overcrowding of land, to avoid undue concentration of 
population, to encourage housing for persons of all income levels, to conserve the value of land and 
buildings and to encourage the most appropriate use of land throughout the Town. 

The enforcement of the zoning bylaw is done by the Building Division as required by law. The Building 
Inspector is responsible for providing information to the public regarding zoning in general and violations 
in particular. When a complaint of a violation is received (i.e., junk cars, businesses in a residential 
zone), an inspection is conducted and a violation notice is sent informing the property owner that they 
are in violation. If the violation is not corrected, the matter is referred to Town Counsel for prosecution. 
Numerous zoning violations have been investigated and corrected without incident. 

The Building Inspection Division provides support to the Zoning Board of Appeals. Consultations are 
conducted relative to information upon applying for special permit, appeals from denials of the Building 
Inspector, and variances. Petitions for these are accepted, reviewed and recommendations to the Board 
are prepared. Following the Board's hearing and issuance of permits, the Division may be asked to 
monitor applications for compliance with permit conditions. 

The purpose and intent of the Massachusetts State Building Code is for the protection of the owners, 
adjacent property owners, occupants and firefighters, to provide for the health, safety and public welfare 
through structural strength and protection of life and property from fire and other hazards during 
construction, to control construction, reconstruction, alterations, repair and demolition. Inspection 



-39- 



requires engineering judgments and the ability to convince the public that code enforcement is not 
arbitrary and to increase likelihood of voluntary compliance. 

The Building Inspector issues permits for the construction/installation of new buildings, additions, 
alterations, foundations, chimneys, woodburning stoves, signs as well as relocation of structures and 
razing of structures. Following the issuance of the building permit, inspection is made of the foundation 
and frame. Upon completion of a new dwelling, a final inspection is conducted and a Certificate of 
Occupancy is issued. The Inspection Division also completes state-mandated safety inspections of schools, 
apartment complexes, etc. The results of many of these inspections are used by the Board of Selectmen 
during renewal of various licenses such as common victualler or alcoholic beverages. 

All plans, whether for subdivision, major industrial projects or other purposes, are reviewed by the 
entire Community Development and Planning Staff. Plans which more specifically involve this division 
are reviewed jointly by all inspectors. In all cases, the developer is consulted both during and after 
the review meeting regarding Inspection Division concerns. Consultations are continuously conducted 
relative to questions of clarification and information of the various State codes. Occasionally, an 
inspector will conduct a site inspection pursuant to one of these requests for information. 

Violations discovered by life-safety inspections result in immediate notification followed by written 
notification. If necessary, the building is also closed pending repairs. A special enforcement program 
is the annual junk car inventory and correction program. In all cases where a violation exists, the 
Building Inspector attempts to resolve the matter using the informal means of consultation with the 
property owner/applicant. 

Coordination with other departments such as fire, police and public works, as well as within the 
division itself, is a continual task. Following a fire, the building and electrical inspectors routinely aid 
the Fire Department by conducting a site inspection and conferring on the fire's cause and are 
occasionally called for an emergency. 

The Inspector Division must stay current on changes to the various State codes which they enforce. 
The codes must be periodically reviewed to keep current. Division meetings are conducted daily to 
facilitate exchange of new information. The State also conducts seminars on these changes occasionally 
which are attended by the inspectors. 



No. of 




Estimated 




Permits 


Iyj2S 


Values 


Fees 


103 


Foundation (Single Family Dwelling) 


$ 412,000 


$ 2,884 


74 


Dwellings (Single Family) 


11,647,200 


87,250 


2 


Foundations (Multi-family) 


15,000 


106 


13 


Multi-family buildings 


11,584,500 


77,728 


11 


New - Other buildings 


7,556,053 


44,589 


622 


Additions and Alterations 
(all types of buildings) 


21,180,081 


142,419 


316 


Other(pools,signs,chimneys,raze,etc.) 


738,270 


10,699 


41 


Certificates of Inspection 


— 


2,226 


1,182 


$53,133,104 


$368,001 



-40- 



Bedrical Inspection 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and 
property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is responsible for 
receiving and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis, inspecting all residential, 
commercial and industrial jobs, approving electrical plans for new buildings, assisting the Fire Department 
in inspection of fires due to faulty electrical devices and seeing that permits are issued for repairs due to 
fire damage. 

Enforcement of fire alarm regulations for new homes, conducting and certifying inspection of schools, 
public buildings, day care centers and nursing homes in conjunction with the building officials, are part 
of the duties of electrical Inspectors. Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the 
cooperation of the Massachusetts Electric Company and corrected without incident. 

There were 756 permits issued in 1989 with a total of $62,012.25 in fees collected. 

Phwbirif mi 6ii Inspection 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas installations is controlled by a State Uniform 
Plumbing and Gas code formulated by the Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under 
authority of Chapter 142 of the General laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

This office completes the inspections for permitting gas, plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. 
Following the initial inspection, additional inspections are completed during construction to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. A final inspection is conducted for the same purpose as well as to sign if 
on a Certificate of Occupancy. Complaints and violations must also be investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 

There were 419 plumbing permits issued with a total of $24,986.00 in fees collected, and 320 gas 
permits issued with a total of $4,558.00 collected, making a total of $29,544.00 in fees collected for the 
year in 1989. 

Summary tf Fees 

Building Permits $368,001.00 

Electrical Permits 62,012.25 

Plumbing and Gas 29,544.00 



Total Fees Collected $ 459,557.25 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Chapter 40A and 40B and the Town By-laws. The Board meets on 
the First Thursday of each month in Memorial Hall Library. Memorial Hall, Elm Square, Second Floor. 



-41- 



The five regular members and four associate members are appointed by the Selectmen and serve without 
pay. The public hearings by the Board are the result of applications in the following areas: 

1. For a variance from the requirements of the By-laws. 

2. For a special permit under the By-Laws. 

3. By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other administrative officer. 

4. For permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town of Andover 
(Comprehensive Permit). 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches requested, legal 
advertisements are published and abutters are notified, as required by law. The public hearings are 
conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following 
the hearing, the members of the Board, when it is considered desirable, view each property in question 
and thereafter hold a meeting, open to the public, at which the Board discusses the petitions which have 
been heard. Based on their views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a decision is rendered, 
signed and filed in the Town Clerk's office. 

During 1989, the Board held 12 regular meetings and 18 deliberation meetings. The Board 
considered 54 petitions and approved 46. There were also 7 applications withdrawn. 

Probably the most significant and controversial issue the Board of Appeals was faced with during the 
decade of the 80' s was affordable housing. This was reflected by the spate of applications for 
comprehensive permits filed during one 12-month period in 1986 and 1987. During that period seven 
applications involving a total of 843 housing units were processed by the Board of Appeals. 

Those seven applications were reviewed by the Board during 16 public hearings involving more than 
60 hours of testimony by the applicants, local officials and citizens. Six of the seven decisions handed 
down by the Board were appealed to the State Housing Appeals Committee which resulted in countless 
more hours of hearings and negotiations. The Board of Appeals was caught n a crunch between teams 
of very aggressive developers (and their attorneys), large groups of very vocal citizens, and a pro- 
affordable housing platform at the state level. 

It took two years for the dust to settle, and by that time the seven applications had been trimmed 
down to just three development project involving 433 new housing units. Those three developments - 
Abbots Pond, Brookside Estates, and Riverview Commons - are all but complete and occupied by new 
town residents as Andover enters the new decade. 

HEALTH DIVISION 

The Health Division of the Department of Community Development and Planning administers programs 
and policies initiated by the Andover Board of Health. The 1980's have been a time of change in public 
health priorities. The Andover Health Department has attempted to accommodate these changes with an 
ongoing review of program priorities, administrative structures and personnel evaluation. 

The health division staff consists of a Director, a Registered Sanitarian, a Health Code Enforcement 
Officer, one full-time Public Health Nurse, one part-time Public Health Nurse and Administrative 
Secretary. The Division is structured to facilitate three operational objectives: administration of the 
Division, providing clinical public health services, addressing significant environmental responsibilities 
impacting health. 

The public health experiences of the past decade have demonstrated the requirement for intimates linkage 

-42- 



among all of these operational components. Environmental issues such as lead, asbestos and radon 
contamination require a multi-discipline approach to achieve control. Regulatory authorities must be 
integrated, prevention and education programs provided and clinical service needs fulfilled. New 
technology, such as video education, provided through local cable television, has been utilized to develop 
a resource library of public health education programs, participating in the area of environmental health. 

Hazardous materials management, which includes raw materials used in local industries and wastes 
materials provided within the community became a priority for action in the 1980's. A local emergency 
planning committee developed a local emergency response plan which has been exercised successfully a 
number of times within the community. Computerization of hazardous materials data is a major goal of 
the department for the 90's. 

The most significant progress achieved in the 1980's was the consolidation of four separate town 
departments into the Department of Community Development and Planning. This enabled these 
departments to integrate their areas of jurisdiction and responsibility in land use and development. A 
more efficient and effective subdivision review process results in better environment protection for 
homeowners and an improved quality of life for all citizens. 

Ctwuwnieabia Disease Contra! 

The Health Division receives all reports of the reportable communicable disease cases and ensures these 
cases are investigated by the Public Health Nurse who sends a case record to the State Department of 
Public Health except Venereal Diseases which are reported directly to the State. Preventing 
communicable diseases and containing them when they occur is a top priority of the Health Department. 
The communicable diseases reported to the Health Department in 1989 are: 

Campylobacter 9 

Shigella 1 

Haemophilus Influenza B-l 
Pertussis 2 

Fifth Disease 1 

Lyme Disease 2 

State regulations regarding reportable diseases are administered by the Public Health Nurse. Mantoux 
testing for exposure to tuberculosis, active disease detection, school and nursing home employment is 
done free of charge by the public health nurse. Positive mantoux reactors and active tuberculosis cases 
are followed and referred to the area Tuberculosis clinic at Lawrence General Hospital. The nurse takes 
histories, makes x-ray appointments, monitors medication, ensures proper blood tests are done and does 
(Snellen) eye exams on clinic patients. 

Mantoux tested 186 

Active Tbc. Investigation 

Reactor Follow-up 40 

Histories and Clinic Cases 5 

Comm. Disease Case Records 39 



Animal Bites 


42 


Chicken Pox 


204 


Salmonella 


12 


Hepatitis 


4 


Giardia 


7 



-43- 



Baa 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

The Andover Health Department offered cholesterol screening clinics on a weekly basis throughout the 
year. Clinic were held in the Nurses office/clinic. A fee of three dollars was charged to replenish the 
supplies. Town employee screening was free. Two Public Health Nurses and a Health Dept. machine 
operator performed the testing. Several cholesterol conferences and classes were attended by clinic 
personnel. 

Andover Resident Cholesterol Screening Clinic 

Clinics 25 

Screened 424 

Elevated 282 

Andover School Personnel Cholesterol Screening Clinic 

Clinic 8 

Screened 92 

Elevated 63 

Andover Senior Center Cholesterol Screening Clinic 

Clinic 4 

Screened 70 

Elevated 36 

Andover School Cholesterol Screening Clinic (Health Fair) 

Clinic 1 

Screened 63 31 students 

29 teachers 

3 Health Fair Workers 

Elevated 5 students 

10 adults 

Influenza and pneumovax 

Clinics were held for Andover residents over sixty or those with certain chronic diseases. The first clinic 
was held at Doherty Middle School on October 26, 1989, with the help of one Board of Health physician, 
two staff R.N.'s, two staff assistants, five volunteer nurses and six volunteer registrars. A second clinic 
was held at the Senior Center on November 16, 1989 with the two VNA Homecare R.N.'s, two Public 
Health Nurses, one Health Dept. staff assistant and three volunteer registrars. Vaccine was given to 
Academy Manor Nursing Home in Andover and they immunized their residents and staff. Twenty-three 
office immunizations were given and four home visits were made to immunize homebound Andover 
residents. 



-44- 



Total Influenza Immunizations Administered 631 doses 

Total Pneumovax Immunizations Administered 21 doses 

Blood lead screening information and referral was provided to Andover residents by the public health 
nurse. 

Pediculosis screening, information and education are provided by the nurse to residents and groups on 
request. Scabies information and education is provided also to residents and groups on request. 

Amblyopia screening clinics were offered by the Andona Society free of charge to children of Andover 
residents age two through five. A special vision test is given and children who failed the test were 
referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up. 

Colo-rectal Screening kits provided by the American Cancer Society are distributed to Andover residents 
through the office for the Elderly Health Clinics. They are returned to the nurse and tested. Positive 
participants are referred to their physician. 

Immunization review, health record review, storage of medication and other medical regulations affecting 
recreational camps for children are enforced through inspection and license withdrawal if the requirements 
are not met. 

Elderly Health Services 

This program promotes health, maintains health and prevents diseases in Andover's senior citizen 
population. Clinics are held at the Housing for the Elderly and at the Andover Commons on a monthly 
basis. Weekly clinics are held at the Senior Center. Tests include vital signs, urine testing, hemoglobin 
testing and weight. Each person receives counselling (diet, medication and referral to M.D.'s of area 
agencies as needed. 



Outreach Clinics 


489 attended 


35 clinics 


Senior Center Clinics 


718 


51 clinics 


Office Visits 


84 




Home Visits 


19 





An Easy Exercise Program is directed by Mrs. Wilson, R.N., Public Health Nurse. It involves range 
of motion exercises, walking, dancing and health education. All participants are required to get 
permission signatures from their physicians and many do the exercises at home, as well as in the class. 

Seventy-two classes were held at the Senior Center. 

Attended 1019 62 classes 

Biologies 

Andover does not offer immunization clinics to its residents but does provide biologies free of charge to 
Andover physicians and schools. The public Health Nurse monitors distribution and usage of the 
vaccines. Some vaccines are ordered from the Department of Public Health and some are picked up by 
the nurse at the Regional Office in Tewksbury. 

Information to area clinics, schools and physicians on various vaccines and those needed for international 
travel, is provided by the nurse and referral is made to vaccination sites. 



-45- 



Board and Committees 

The Public Health Nurse serves on the following boards and committees. 

-V.N.A Home Care - Professional Advisory Committee 

-Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley Advisory Board Long Range Planning Committee 

-Welfare Advisory Board 

-Fidelity House Human Rights Committee 

-Welfare Advisory Board 

-Fidelity House Human Rights Committee 

Conferences and Meetings -Continuing Education 

The Public Health Nurse attends seminars and conferences. They obtain Continuing Education Credits 
which are necessary to renew their licenses in Massachusetts. 

Clinical Highlights of the Eighties 

Cholesterol clinics have been popular since the Reflotron machine was purchased by the Town in 1988. 
Emphasis was placed on educating participants about what the cholesterol number means, what constitutes 
a low cholesterol low fat diet and giving them information brochures to read and study at home. This 
has contributed greatly to promoting health preventing heart disease as well as educating Andover 
residents how to maintain good health. 

The presence of communicable diseases such as measles and pertussis (whooping cough) in the 80's 
indicates the constant need to protect our children through immunization at the proper time. Measles 
outbreaks in vaccinated children throughout the U.S. created new recommendations as to immunization 
schedules. A vaccine was perfected against Haemophilus influenza B. Children should be immunized 
at eighteen months. It is required immunization for nursery school children eighteen months to five 
years. Be sure your pre-school child is protected against Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Polio, Measles, 
Mumps & Rubella and Hib. Immunization at the proper time can prevent these diseases. 

AIDS has reached epidemic proportions in the United States in the 80' s and is an enormous public health 
challenge. Information and education are the primary prevention weapons we have against AIDS at this 
time. The Public Health Nurse provides information, counseling, and referral. The Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health, provided AIDS seminars on counseling techniques and general AIDS 
updated information for Health Department staff. Additionally, the health division has encouraged and 
supported formation of a citizen advocacy and support group. 

Dog bites in Andover have almost doubled this year. Obey the leash law and be sure your dog or cat 
is vaccinated against rabies. 



-46- 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Wenanj Protection 

During 1989 the Conservation Commission under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, conducted 
one hundred forty public hearings, seventy-seven Determinations of Applicability, acted on twenty Notices 
of Intent, issued eighteen Orders of Condition, twenty-five Amendments, fifteen Extensions, fifty-nine 
Certificates of Compliance, nineteen Enforcement Orders, and seventeen Findings Of Insignificance For 
Proposed Plan Changes. 

Under the provisions of new Massachusetts Wetland Protection Act filing fees the Conservation 
Commission collected four thousand six hundred sixty-two dollars and fifty cents. 

Wetfanfe Map 

Nineteen Final Wetland Map Boundary Changes were completed in 1989. 

Four parcels, totaling 20.89 acres, were acquired as permanent open space through expenditure from the 
Conservation Fund. A 26.79 acre parcel located off Federal Street was donated under the provisions of 
a Conservation Grant by William J. Callahan and William J. Callahan, Jr. 

land Management 

A "Conservation & Recreation Plan" completed in 1989 was approved by the Executive Office of 
Environmental Affairs, granting eligibility in Division of Conservation Services programs through March 
1994. 

A pilot forestry management project on the Bald Hill / Wood Hill Conservation Area was completed. 

The Dale Street Conservation Area (formerly the site of the Dale Street sewage pumping station) adjacent 
to the Shawsheen River was improved in accordance with a management plan, and is now open to the 
public for passive recreational use. 

The Conservation Overseers conducted a clean-up and beautification of conservation areas throughout the 
Town. 



-47- 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1984. Regular Meetings are held on the second 
Thursday of every month, and the annual meeting is held during the month of June. Meetings are 
conducted in the main office, on the second floor of the Recreation Hall in Stowe Court. 

At the annual meeting held on June 7, 1989, Richard A. Savrann, a member of the Andover Housing 
Authority for nineteen years, was re-elected to serve as chairman by the Board of Directors. The 
following officers were elected for a one year term: 

Richard A. Savrann - Chairman 

Mary Jane Powell - Vice Treasurer 

Eileen Connolly - Treasurer 

Francis McNulty - Asst. Treasurer 

Nancy M. Marcoux - Secretary 

Ronald Hajj - Asst. Secretary 

The Andover Housing Authority is funded under the Executive Office of Communities and Development 
(EOCD). The Town of Andover has absolutely no financial obligation in the construction or operation 
of these housing projects. 

Chapter 667 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 2 1 8 units of Elderly Housing which are located in chestnut 
Courts (42 units), Grandview Terrace (40 units), Frye Circle (96 units), and Stowe Court (40 units). The 
average monthly rent this year in the elderly units was $140.00. The income limits for elderly housing 
are: 

One person: $17,248.00 Two people: $19,712.00 

There is also an asses limit of $15,000.00 in order to qualify. During the past year, (1989), twenty- 
eight tenants moved into elderly housing. 

Chapter 200-1 

The Andover Housing Authority manages fifty-six units of Family Housing including two, three, and four 
bedroom units. The income limits for Family Housing are as follows: 

Two people: $19,712.00 Five people: $26,180.00 

Three people: 22,176.00 Six people : 27,720.00 

Four people: 24,640.00 Seven people: 29,260.00 

Eight people: $30,800.00 

During 1989, six new families moved into Family Housing. 

Section 8 Homing Assistance Program (Federal Fun &-HUD) 

The Andover Housing Authority has 59 Certificates under this Federally subsidized program, which 
permits participants to live in private accommodations, paying approximately 30% of their adjusted 
income toward rent. The total rent for the apartment can not exceed the Fair Market Rent for that size 



-48- 



unit. The Fair Market Rent is mandated by HUD. The Housing Authority pays the difference in rent 
directly to the landlord. The condition of the unit must meet basic housing standards, and is inspected 
annually. The town of Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owner. All of the 59 
Certificates allocated to the Andover Housing are under lease. Several of the Certificates under this 
program are mobile, and allow the certificate holder to seek housing in another city or town which 
participates in the Section 8 Mobility Program. The Andover Housing Authority also manages 43 Section 
8 Vouchers. Under the Voucher Program, participants are allowed greater flexibility in locating an 
apartment, since the FMR does not have to be adhered to. If a participant leased an apartment which 
exceeds the Fair Market Rent set for that size unit, the participant is responsible for paying the difference 
in rent. The Housing Authority will only subsidize the tenant based on the FMR. Presently this Program 
is 100% leased. 

Chapter 707 Rental Assignee Prtym (STATE FUNDS) 

This State Program is basically the same as the Federal Program except that these certificates must be 
used in the Town of Andover. The Housing Authority has thirty-one certificates which assist low income 
elderly and families under this program. The applicant pays approximately 25% of their adjusted income 
towards rent, (as compared with 30% under the Federal Program), and the Housing Authority pays the 
difference. There is a separate maximum rent schedule under the 707 Program which is slightly higher 
the Section 8 FMR. 

Chapter 689 

This is the sixth year that Fidelity House has been in operation. It is located within the Memorial Circle 
Project adjacent to Rogers Brook, and houses seven handicapped persons and one full-time counselor. 
The monthly rent received from Fidelity House in 1989 was $910.00. The rent is based on the income 
of the residents, and averaged approximately $130.00 each. 

Accomplish twenty 

The Andover Housing Authority was awarded a grant in the amount of $680,000.00 by the EOCD to 
develop a shared house for eight (8) adults under the Chapter 689 Program, in conjunction with the 
Lawrence Area Office of the Department of Mental Health. 

Due to fiscal constraints, this project is currently frozen pending the availability of construction funds. 

The Andover Housing Authority received and award for 18 additional Section 8 Vouchers from the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. These Vouchers have all been leased to the Town. 

In addition, the Housing Authority has 5 new Chapter 707 Certificates under lease at Brookside Estates. 



-49- 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The Library news for 1989 has been that of extraordinary use provided by less than staff operating 
to the peak of efficiency, flexibility and creativity. The astronomical figures from the past ten years show 
Inter-library Loan up by 243%, Children's Room circulation up 91% and Reference questions up 73%... 
Every month the circulation has been going up 2-27% from that particular month of the previous year. 

The new facility has proved to be as functional as it is aesthetically pleasing. The Fund Raising 
Committee for the artwork finished its role with the purchase of three pieces of sculpture; Centerpiece, 
The Birdwatchers and the Beaver, receiving final approval of the Trustees. Landscaping the front of the 
building is awaiting funding. 

Margaret (Mel) Jurgen was appointed to the Trustees replacing Norma Gammon. 

The Friends of the Library, once the Hall and other public rooms were again available, provided an 
active year of programs for adults and children. The Friends not only planned many of the programs but 
provided refreshments as well as underwrote the costs. Their major donations to the library was a new 
Balwin grand piano. 

The very popular UN day Reception for Foreign Students co= sponsored by AFS was resumed. The 
second annual English lecture series has a larger attendance than that of the first. Other programs included 
Great Books, book discussion groups, lectures, drama, recitals and films. 

Once the staff was settled into the new building and attention to construction began to take less time, 
we could concentrate on library services which had been held in abeyance for the past several years. 
Many brochures and pamphlets were produced, all with the intent of helping the public learn about 
services and the location of materials for themselves without the need of staff help. 

The Spade and Trowel Garden Club once again provided lovely Christmas decorations. The Girl 
Scouts of Troop #664 painted the windows of the Children's Room with the Christmas scenes. 

The Merrimack Valley Library Consortium has become a major operation. Twenty-four cities and 
towns in Northeastern Massachusetts are full members with eleven towns plus Andover High School as 
partial members with access to the database. The combined circulation is over 2 1/2 million items a year 
and a database of one half million items. In essence the database is a gigantic card catalog for this corner 
of the state. The long awaited upgrade of the computer with the migration to Unix will finally allow for 
a much easier to use system for the library patron. By April the CL Catalog should be in place. 

The highest accolades this year must go to the library staff who after living through the building 
construction years still had the energy to give their all for the increased public service demands, and 
nearly always with a smile. 



-50- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



MARCH 27, 1989 



Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, March 6, 1989, the 
Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs 
to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. All eight precincts: 
Precinct One, Precinct Two, Precinct Three, Precinct Four, Precinct Five, 
Precinct Six, Precinct Seven, Precinct Eight are to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, 
Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-SEVENTH DAY OF MARCH, 1989 

at 8:00 A.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I the subsciber, one of the 
Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the inhabitants of said 
Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said 
warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, 
on each Schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where 
bills and notices are usually posted and by publication in the Andover 
Townsman. Said warrants have been posted and published fourteen days. 

Joseph Axelrod 
Constable 



ARTICLE 1. Took up Article 1. and proceeded to vote Town Offices. 



The 



ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. The polls were 
opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M. ELECTION 







The total number of ballots cast was 4 


,507, viz: 




Prec. 


1. 


- 514 Prec. 2. - 666 Prec. 3. - 569 


Prec . 4 . 


- 622 


Prec. 


5. 


- 493 Prec. 6. - 503 Prec. 7. - 619 


Prec. 8. 


- 521 



MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 



371 


455 


396 


379 


301 


347 


411 


353 


James D. Doherty 


3013 


127 


190 


152 


217 


172 


135 


168 


138 


John Doyle 


1299 


16 


21 


21 


26 


20 


21 


40 


30 


Blanks 

SELECTMEN 

TWO FOR THREE YEARS 


195 


327 


387 


352 


322 


221 


276 


278 


287 


Gerald H. Silverman 


2450 


337 


399 


321 


282 


229 


273 


287 


318 


Charles A. Wesson 


2446 


132 


208 


197 


267 


235 


177 


223 


189 


George Danneman 


1628 


172 


250 


213 


288 


239 


211 


349 


205 


W. John Dziadul 


1927 


60 


88 


55 


85 


62 


69 


101 


43 


Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
TWO FOR THREE YEARS 


563 


243 


382 


293 


343 


247 


267 


243 


242 


Richard L. Hubbell 


2260 


179 


235 


205 


227 


204 


230 


355 


203 


Christopher M. Outwin 


1838 


366 


444 


397 


411 


315 


312 


397 


392 


Andres C. Salazar 


3034 


240 


271 


243 


263 


220 


197 


243 


205 


Blanks 


1882 



-51- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING MARCH 27, 1989 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
8 ONE FDR FIVE YEARS 



419 531 455 473 338 382 443 388 Eileen M. Connolly 3429 
95 135 114 149 155 121 176 133 Blanks 1078 

After final action of Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by 
virtue of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, April 3, 
1989 at 7:00 P.M. at the J. Everett Collins Performing Arts Center, 
Shawsheen Road. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 977 voters ad- 
mitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 
7:10 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Susan J. Morrison of Ballard- 
vale United Church, Andover, Massachusetts. 

Salute to the flag was led by Selectman Gail L. Ralston. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 23 non-voters to the meeting. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the 
Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and the return of service of the Constable. 

Upon morion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator 
refer to the article by number and by subject matter. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three 
years, two members of the School Conmittee for three years, one member of 
the Andover Housing Authority for five years, and any other Town Officers 
required by law to be elected by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot . The Polls 

will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter announced the results of the election on 

March 27, 1989 and declared James D. Doherty as Moderator and that he had 

previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that 

office . 

The Town Clerk also declared that other successful candidates elected 

to their respective offices had been sworn to the faithful performance of 

the duties of their offices: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

Gerald H. Silverman Selectman for Three Years 

Charles H. Wesson, Jr. Selectman for Three Years 

Richard L. Hubbell School Conmittee for Three Years 

Andres C. Salazar School Conmittee for Three Years 

Eileen M. Connolly Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 



-52- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all o^her officers not required by law to be elected 

by ballot. ELECTION 

NOT REQUIRED 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Alcide J. LeCendre 5X 

BALLOT 
be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1989, 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, 
and to issue a note or notes therefore, payable within one year, and to 
renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year 
in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. REVENUE 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 3 be 
approved as printed in the warranc . 



ANTICIPATION 
BORROW INC 



ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money 
the Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations from avail- 
able funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and 
interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning 
July 1, 1989 and ending June 30, 1990. 



GENERAL COVERNMEOT 



THE BUDGET 



1 PERSONAL SERVICES 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $7,400 for 
out-of-state travel. 

Total Appropriated 

Fran Taxation 



S 1,121,766.00 

$ 611,400.00 

$ 1,733,166.00 

$ 1,733,166.00 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 

Less investment income 
of $27,000. trun Ceme- 
tery reserve. 



Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

Less $50,000 frcm 
Ambulance Receipts . 

Including out-of-state 
travel in the amount of 
$6,600. 

Less $50,000 frcm ambu- 
lance receipts. 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



$ 1,612,624.00 

$ 1,736,222.00 

$ 3,348,846.00 

$ 3,321,846.00 

$ 5,251,169.00 

$ 494,199.00 



$ 5,745,368.00 
$ 5,645,368.00 



-53- 



4 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 



OTHER EXPENSES 



PUBLIC WORKS 






ERVICES Less $131,374. frcm Sewer 


$ 


1,610,812.00 


offset receipts. 






NSES Including out-of-state 


$ 


4,462,600.00 



travel in the amount of 
$5,100. 

Less $972,750 from Sewer 
offset receipts. 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 



9 PERSONAL SERVICES 
10 OIKER SERVICES 



$ 6,073,412.00 
$ 4,969,288.00 



ES 


$ 


712 


,059.00 


Including out-of-state 


5 


100 


000.00 


travel in the amount of 








$2,000 








Total Appropriated 


$ 


812 


059.00 


From Taxation 


$ 


812 


059.00 



11 PERSONAL SERVICES 



12 OTHER EXPENSES 



LIBRARY 

Less $55,250 from 
Merrimack Valley Library 
Consortium. 

Including out-of-state 
travel in the amount of 
$900. 

Less $19,771 in State 
library aid and $118,000 
from Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium. 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



868,621.00 



505,965.00 



$ 1,375,586.00 
$ 1,182,565.00 



13 PERSONAL SERVICES 

14 OTHER EXPENSES 



ANDOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Including out-of-state 
travel in the amount of 
$8000. 

Total Appropriated 

From Taxation 



$ 17,318,130.00 
$ 4,172,922.00 

$ 21,491,052.00 
$ 21,491,-052.00 



15 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

Total Appropriated $ 88,997.00 
Frcm Taxation $ 88,997.00 



-54- 



16 



17 



18 
19 



20 
21 

22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 



1988 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Less 5208,500 from offset 
receipts. 

Including out-of-state 
travel in the amount of 
S12CC. 

Less 5112,550 from off- 
set receipts. 



COMPENSATION FUND 
RESERVE FUND 



INTEREST EXPENSE 



BOND REDEMPTION 



Less 5400,000 from sewer 
offset receipts. 

Less 5500,000 from sewer 
offset receipts and 
535,000 from parking 
meter receiots. 



STABILIZATION FUND 
INSURANCE EXPENSES 
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 
RETIREMENT - PERSONAL SERVICES 
RETIREMENT - OTHER EXPENSES 
CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 
NON-CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT 
RETIREMENT FUND 



HEALTH INSURANCE 



Less 5214,000 from 
Special Pension 
Reserve Fund. 



Total appropriated 
From Taxation 
TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRATION 
TOTAL FROM TAXATION 



5 436,859.00 
5 190,510.00 



Total Appropriated 


5 


627,369.00 


From Taxation 


5 


306,319.00 




5 


500,000.00 




5 


200,000.00 


Total Appropriated 


5 


700,000.00 


From Taxation 


5 


700,000.00 


FIXED 







5 2,850,157.00 
5 3,917,700.00 

5 60,000.00 

5 906,300.00 

5 21,000.00 

5 29,600.00 

5 4,740.00 

5 1,226,762.00 

5 78,00u.00 

5 414,000.00 

5 2,196,000.00 
511,704,259.00 
510,555,259.00 
553,700,114.00 
550,005,919.00 



-55- 



6' 



SALARIES- 

F.r.RPTF.n 

OFFICIALS 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 5. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ' 
ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the s alar ies of 
the elected Town Officers be established as follows: 



Town Moderator 



Selectmen 



5100 for each Annual Town Meeting and $25 for 
each Special Town Meeting except when it falls 
within the Annual Town Meeting. 



Chairman 
Members 



$1000 per year 
$ 800 per year 



GRANTS 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into 
contracts from time to time for the expendicure of any funds allotted 
to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government 
under any State or Federal grant program. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
6 as printed in the warrant . 



DPW 
CONTRACTS 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager 
to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Works Comnissioners , the County Commissioners and/or either of them 
for the construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of 
Andover for the ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
7 as printed in the warrant . 



FREE CASH 



ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the 
Assessors to use in free cash to reduce tlie 1989-90 tax rate and to 
affect appropriations voted at the 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it v/as VOTED that the Town 
Assessors be permitted to use $420,000 in Free Cash to reduce the 
Fiscal Year 1990 Tax Rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 
1989 Town Meeting. 



UNEXPENDED 
BALANCES 



ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended 
appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following 
unexpended appropriations be transferred and appropriated to the Debt 
Service Interest Expense Account : 

Article 54 1980 Riverina Road Punping Station $23,655.89 
Article 23 1988 Woburn Street Sidewalk 10,000.00 

$33,655.89 



-56- 



1989 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



SPECIAL 


ARTICLES - FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS 








Article 


11 


Unpaid Bills $ 




360 


.14 


Article 


13 


Fireworks - 4th of July 


10 


,000 


.00 


Article 


21 


Traffic Lights - Haggetts Pond & Lowell St. 


75 


,000 


.00 


Article 


23 


AFD Tower Punper 


180 


,000 


.00 


Article 


24 


Public Safety Study 


25 


,000 


.00 


Article 


30 


Sidewalks - Clark Road & Andover Street 

Total $ 


75 


,000 


.00 




365 


,360 


.14 


SPECIAL 


ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 








Article 


9 


Unexpended Balances $ 

From: Art. 54, 1980 River ina Road 

Puiping Station $23,655.89 
Art. 23, 1988 Wobum Street 

Sidewalk 510,000.00 


33, 


655. 


,89 


Article 


14 


Harvesting of Trees to Conservation Fund 


14, 


337. 


00 


Article 


29 


Water Mains: 

Art. 23, 1984 Wood Hill 

Water Tank $ 2,480.16 
Art. 16, 1985 Wood Hill 

Water Tank $ 71,285.12 
Water Grant Acct. WSWS #270 $ 11,234.42 

Total $ 


85, 


000. 


00 




132. 


992. 


89 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 20 SHED Temporary Classrooms 

Article 25 Andover High School Roof 

Article 28 Sewer - Lowell Street, West Parish Drive, 

Birch Road and Thresher Road 

Article 32 Storm Drains 

Article 31 Engineering Specs 

Article 33 Sewer - North Street 



$ 150,000.00 

500,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

100,000.00 
500,000.00 
190,000.00 

$ 2,440,000.00" 



Article 8 Free Cash 

$420,000 to be used to reduce the FY90 Tax Rate 

Article 73 Bond Authorization Rescission 

Art. 65, 1987 Annual Town Meeting $ 2,800,000 
Art. 66, 1987 Annual Town Meeting $ 5,500,000 



A true record 
ATTEST 




££*££_ 



Elden R. Salter, OC 
Town Clerk 



-57- 



5 94.91 


Fire 


2.50 


Gen. Govt. 


5.90 


Gen. Oyn. 


28.00 


Police 


228.83 


Police 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to 

acquire any necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of 

eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction. CHAPTER 90 

ROAD EASEMENTS 
Upon motion made and duly seconded j.t was VOTED to approve 

Article 10 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 

funds a sum not to exceed $5,000 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation 

was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. UNPAID BILLS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer from 

available funds the sum of $360 . 14 to pay the following unpaid bills 

incurred in a prior fiscal year: 

VENDOR 

Lawrence General Hospital 
Commonwealth of Mass DES 
Commonwealth of Mass DES 
L & M Radiology 
Macartneys 

$ 360.14 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS. More than the 4/5 required. 

ARTICLE 12. To act upon the report of the To\m officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

TOWN REPORT 
Article 12 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer from avaj.lable funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of 

the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $10,000 for fireworks for the 

1989 July Fourth Celebration. FIREWORKS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 13 
be approved as printed in the \rarrant in the amount of $10,000 from 
available funds. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available 

funds a sum not to exceed $14,337; said sum equal to the proceeds 

received tram the harvesting of trees on Conservation land in 1988, 

and appropriate to ::he Conservation Fund. CONSERVATION 

FUND TRANSFER 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer from 

available funds a sum not to exceed $14,337; said sum equal to the 

proceeds received from the harvesting of trees on Conservation land 

in 1988, and appropriate to the Conservation Fund. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 4 IB of 

,, .. ^ , c DIRECT DEPOSIT 
-hapter 41, Massachusetts GeneraJ Laws, providing for payment of — mp r nyrp 

publ.'.c employees by direct bonk deposits. PAYCHECKS 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 15 

3e approved as printed in the warrant. 



-58- 



8 



CHAPTER 90 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds 
a sum not to exceed $515,134; said sum equal to the Town's 1988 Chapter 90 
apportionment from the Commonwealth, and appropriate to Public Works 
chapter 90 road projects. 

Article 16 was WITHDRAWN. 



USE OF 

DEFAULT 

FUNDS 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 245 of the 
Acts of 1988 amending M. G. L. Chapter 41, Section 81U to provide for 
che expenditure of default funds by Planning Boards. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by George S. Moran. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 17 
be approved as printed in the warrant . 



TOWN BUDGET 
TRANSFERS 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sun not to 
exceed $300,000.00 from amounts previously appropriated at the April 4, 
1988, Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 33B. 

Article 18 was WITHDRAWN. 



DENIAL OF 



LICENSES 

Approved by 

A.G. 

May 5, 1989 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 57, "Local licenses and 
permits; denial, revocation or suspension for failure to pay municipal 



=-■ taxes or charges," and adopt the following bylaw: 



(a) The tax collector or other municipal official responsible 
for records of all municipal taxes, assessments, betterments 
and other municipal charges , hereinafter referred to as the 
tax collector, shall annually furnish to each department, 
board, commission or division, hereinafter referred to as the 
licensing authority, that issues licenses or permits including 
renewals and transfers, a list of any person, corporation, 
or business enterprise, hereinafter referred to as the party, 
that has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, 
assessments, betterments or other municipal charges for not 
less than a twelve month period, and that such party has not 
filed in good faith a pending application for an abatanent 
of such tax or a pending petition before the appellate tax 
board. 

lb) The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any 
license or permit , including renewals and transfers of any 
party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing 
authority from the tax collector; provided, however, that written 
notice is given to the party and the tar. collector, as required 
by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, 
:o be held not earlier than fourteen days after said notice. 
Said list shall be prima facie evidence for denial, revocation 
or suspension of said license or permit to any party. Tlie 
tax collector shall have the right to incervene in any hearing 
conducted with respect to such license denial, revocation 
or suspension. Any findings made by the licensing authority 
with respect to such license denial, revocation or suspension 
shall be made only for the purposes of such proceeding and 
shall not be relevant to or introduced in any other proceeding 
at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation 
or suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or 
revoked under this section shall not oe reissued or renewed 
until the license authority receives a certificate issued by 
the tax collector that the party is in good standing with respect 
to any and all local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments 
or other municipal charges, payable to the municipality as 
the date of issuance of said certificate. 



-59- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 



Article 19 (Cont. ) 



(c) Any party shall be given an opportunity to enter into 

a payment agreement , thereby allowing the licensing authority 
to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the license 
or permit and the validity of said license shall be conditioned 
upo.i the satisfactory compliance v/ith said agreement. Failure 
to comply with said agreement shall be grounds for the suspension 
or revocat ion of said license or permit ; provided , however , 
that the holder be given notice and a hearing as required by 
applicable provisions of lav/. 

(d) The board of selectmen may waive such denial, suspension 

or revocation if it finds there is no direct or indirect business 
interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders , 
if any, or members of his immediate family, as defined in section 
one of chapter two hundred and sixty-eight in the business 
or activity conducted in or on said property. 

This section shall not apply to the following licenses and 
permits: open burning; section thirteen of chapter forty-eight; 
bicycle permits; section eleven A of chapter eighty-five,- sales 
of articles for charitable purposes, section thirty-three of 
chapter one hundred and one; children work permits, section 
six:y-nine of chapter one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associ- 
ations dispensing food or beverage licenses, section twenty-one 
E of chapter one hundred and forty; dog licenses, section one 
hundred and thirty-seven of chapter one hundred and forty; 
fishing, hunting, trapping license, section twelve of chapter 
one hundred and thirty-one; marriage licenses, section twenty-eight 
of chapter two hundred and seven; and theatrical events, public 
exhibition permits, section one hundred and eighty-one of chapter 
one hundred and forty. 
Said miscellaneous bylaw is to be numbered by the Town Clerk. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to waive the reading 

of Article 19 in its entirety. 

Upon motion made and d'liy seconded it was VOTED to amend the Town 

By-Laws by adding the following section to Article XII: 



Section 32. Licenses and Tax Delinquency 

(a) The tax collector or otter municipal official responsible 
for records of ail municipal taxes, assessments, betterments 
and ether municipal charges, hereinafter referred to as the 
tax collector, shall annually furnish to each department, 
board, commission or division, hereinafter referred to as the 
licensing authority, that issues licenses or permits including 
renewals and transfers, a list of any person, corporation, 

or business enterprise, hereinafter referred to as the party, 
that has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, 
assessments, betterments or other municipal charges for not 
less than a twelve month period, and that such party lias not 
filed in good faith a pending application for an abatement 
of such tax or a pending petition before the appellate tax 
board. 

(b) The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any 
license or permit , including renewals and transfers of any 
party whose name appears on said list furnished to the licensing 
authority from the tax collector; provided, however, that written 
notice is given to the party and the tax collector, as required 
by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, 
to be held not earlier than fourteen days after said notice. 

Said list shall be prima facie evidence for denial, revocation 
or suspension of said license or permit to any party. The 



-60- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 



Article 19 (Cont. ) 



tax collector shall have the right to intervene in any hearing 
conducted with respect to such license denial, revocation 
or suspension. Any findings made by the licensing authority 
with respect to such license denial, revocation or suspension 
shall be irade only for the purposes of such proceeding and 
shall not be relevant to or introduced in any other proceeding 
at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation 
or suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or 
revoked under this section shall not be reissued or renewed 
until the license authority receives a certificate issued by 
the tax collector that the party is in good standing with respect 
to any and all local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments 
or other municipal charges, payable to the municipality as 
the date of issuance of said certificate. 

(c) Any party shall be given an opportunity to enter into 

a payment agreement, thereby allowing the licensing authority 
to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the license 
or permit and the validity of said license shall be conditioned 
upon the satisfactory compliance with said agreement. Failure 
to comply with said agreement shall be grounds for the suspension 
i or revocation of said license or permit; provided, however, 

that the holder be given notice and a hearing as required by 
applicable provisions of law. 

(d) The board of selectmen may waive such denial, suspension 

or revocation if it finds there is no direct or indirect business 
interest by the property owner, its officers or stockholders, 
if any, or members of his irrmodiate family, as defined in section 
one of chapter two hundred and sixty-eight in the business 
or activity conducted in or on said property. 

This section shall not apply to the following licenses and 
permits: open burning; section thirteen of chapter forty-eight; 
bicycle permits; section eleven A of chapter eighty-five; Seles 
of articles for charitable purposes, section thirty-three of 
chapter one hundred and one; children work permits, section 
sixty-nine of chapter one hundred and forty-nine; clubs, associ- 
ations dispensing food or beverage licenses, section twenty-one 
E of chapter one hundred and forty; dog licenses, section one 
hundred and thirty-seven of chapter one hundred and forty; 
fishing, hunting, trapping license, section twelve of chapter 
one hundred and thirty-one; marriage licenses, section twenty-eight 
of chapter two hundred and seven; and tlieatncal events, public 
exhibition permits, section one hundred and eighty-one of chapter 
one hundred and forty. 

Article 19 passed by a MAJORITY VOTE. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, 

by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination 

PORTABLE Qf tne foregoirtg al)d appropriate the sum of $350,000, more or less, to 

CLASSROOMS 

FOR SHED acquire temporary classrooms for SHED, to be located at the Shawsheen 

School; and further, to authorize the Town Manager and the Selectmen 
to petition the General Court for the passage of a special law author- 
izing the Town to issue notes in anticipation of any bonds or notes 
authorized hereunder for a term in excess of two years, or to take any 
other action relative to the foregoing matters; funds expended are to 
be repaid to the Town over a period of years by SPED. 



-61- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MZ2TING, APRIL 3, 1909 

Article 20 (Cone. ) 

A report by the Andovar Planning Board was read by Michael Houghton. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$150,000 be appropriated to purchase and install temporary portable 
classrooms to be located at the Shawsheen School and initially used by 
SHED; that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer with tl« approval 
of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow, not exceeding 
$150,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(9), of ':he General 
Laws, as amended, and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds, or notes of the Town therefor; and, further, that the 
Town Manager and the Selectmen are authorized on behalf of the Town to 
petition the General Court for the passage of a special law authorizing 
the Town to issue notes in anticipation of the bonds or notes authorized 
hereby for a term in excess of two years. 

The VOTE YES - C32 NO - 238 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Team will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of 

^ ^ _, ^ ^ „.,,- ~„„ TRAFFIC SIGNALS 
the foregoing and appropriate the sun of $75,000, or any greater or TTlsfTT - ^ — I 

lesser sun, for the design and installation of a traffic signal at HAGGETTS POND 

ROAD 
Lowell Street and Haggetts Pond Road and for costs incidental and 

related thereto, including che acquisition of any easements required 

in connection therewith, or take any other action relative thereto. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board ./as read by Susan G. Stott. 

Upon notion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 
Article 21 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $75,000 from 
Available Funds. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 

Selectmen to acquire by purchase or gift or to take by eminent domain 

tor off-street parking use in conjunction with the Free Church, the 

fee or any lesser interest in the following described parcel of land: u^ aCQU'ST- 



Lot 16 of Assessors' Mr.p 39, supposed to be owned by TION - OFF 
Donald I. and Barbara L. Richmond, containing 17,500 STREET PARKING 
square feet , more or less ; 

to appropriate and raise oy taxation, by transfer from avanaole 
funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing tne sum 
of $250,000, more or less, for said acquisition and for costs inci- 
dental and related thereto; and further, to authorize the Town Manager 
and the Selectmen to petition the General Court for the passage of a 
special law authorizing the Town to issue notes in anticipation of 
any bonds or noces authorized hereunder for a term in excess of two 
years, or to take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 
Article 22 was WITHDRAWN. 



-62- 



12 



FIRE 
TRUCK 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $280,000 or any greater or lesser sum for the 
purchase of a Fire Department Aerial Water Tower Pumper to replace the 
1969 aerial platform; and further, to authorize the Town Manager and the 
Selectmen to petition the General Court for the passage of a special law 
authorizing the Town to issue notes in anticipation of any bonds or notes 
authorized hereunder for a term in excess of two years, or to take any 
other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 
23 as printed in the warrant in the amount of 5180,000 from Available 
Funds. 



PUBLIC 
SAFETY 
CENTER 
IMPROVE- 

MENTS 



ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the 
foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $125,000 for the purpose of 
construction, remodeling, reconstruction and /or repairs, including related 
architectural/engineering services, for the Public Safety Center,- and 
further, to authorize the Town Manager and Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for the passage of a special law authorizing the Town to 
issue notes in anticipation of any bonds or notes authorized hereunder 
for a term in excess of two years, or to take any other action relative 
to the foregoing matters. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan G. Stott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer from 
Available Funds and appropriate the sum of $25,000 for the purpose of 
a study and needs analysis of the Public Safety requirements of the 
Fire and Police Departments. 



SCHOOL 

BUILDING 

PLAN 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing, 
and appropriate the sum of $500,000, more or less, for the purpose of 
implementing the Andover School Committee's Master Plan, including but not 
limited to, construction, remodeling, reconstruction and/or repairs 
including related architectural/engineering services; and further, to 
authorize the Town Manager and Selectmen to petition the General Court 
for the passage of a special law authorizing the Town to issue notes in 
anticipation of any bonds or notes authorized hereunder for a term in 
excess of two years, or to take any other action relative to the foregoing 
matter:;. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Michael Houghton. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that 
the sum of $500,000 be hereby appropriated for reconstructing or making 
extraordinary repairs to the Andover High School roof; that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow not exceeding $500,000 under and pursuant to 



-63- 



ADJOURNED JiNHUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989A 

Article 25 (Cont. ) 

Chapter 44, Section 7(3A), of the General Laws, as amended and supplemented , 
or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor; and, further, that the Town Manager and the Selectmen are 
authorized on behalf of the Town to petition the General Court for the 
passage of a special law authorizing the Town to issue notes in anticipa- 
tion of the bonds or notes authorized hereby for a term in excess of two 
years. 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XI, Section 6, 
by deleting the section in its entirety and substituting the following: 

Section 6. Town Clerk's Fees. 

Fees for the following Town Clerk's services are to be set by the Board 
of Selectmen: 



(1) For filing and indexing assignment for the benefit of 
creditors 



TOWN CLERK'S FEES 



(2) Fur correcting errors in a record of birth Disapproved by 

A. G. Office 

(3) For furnishing a certificate of birth f^y 5 ( ^939 

( 4 ) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of birth 

(5) Fur entering delayed record of birth 

(6) For filing certificate of a person conducting business 
under any title other than his real nasva 

(7) For the filing by a person conducting business under any 
title other than his real name of a statement of change 
of his residence, or of his discontinuance, retirement 

or withdrawal from, or a change of location of such business 

(8) For furnishing certified copy of certificate of person 
conducting business under any title other than his real 
name, or a statement by such person of his discontinuance, 
retirement or withdrawal from such business 

(9) For recording the name and address, the date and number 
of the certificate issued to a person registered for the 
practice of podiatry in the Commonwealth 

(10) For correcting errors in a record of death 

(11) For furnishing a death certificate 

(12) For issuing and recording licenses to junk collectors 

(13) For issuing and recording licenses to keepers of billiard 
saloons, pool or sippio roans or tables, bowling alley, etc.: 

First table or alley 

Each additional table or alley 

(14) For entering notice of intention of marriage and issuing 
certificate thereof 



-64- 



14- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 



Article 26 (Cont. ) 



(15) For entering marriage certificate filed by persons outside 
the Commonwealth 

(16) For issuing certificate of marriage 

( 17 ) For correcting errors in a record of marriage 

(18) For recording certificate of registration granted to a 
person to engage in the practice of optometry or issuing 
a certified copy thereof 

(19) For recording the name of the owner of a certificate of 
registration as a physician or osteopath in the Commonwealth 

(20) For recording order granting locations of poles, piers, 
abutments or conduits, alterations or transfers thereof, 
and increase in number of wires and cable or attachments 
under the provisions of Section 22 of Chapter 166: 

Each petition 

Each additional street or way 

(21) For examining records or papers relating to birth, marriage 
or deaths upon the application of any person, the actual 
expense thereof, but not less than 

(22) For copying any manuscript or record pertaining to a birth, 
marriage or death, per page 

(23) For receiving and filing of a complete inventory of all 
items to/ included in a "closing out sale", etc. 

(24) For filing a copy of written statement or declaration of 
trust by the trustees of an association or trust, or any 
amendment thereof as provided in Section 2, Chapter 182 

(25) Voter's card 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the reading 
of Article 26 in its entirety by waived. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article XI, 

Section 6, by deleting the section in its entirety and substituting the 

following: Section 6. Town Clerk's Fees. 

Fees for the following Town Clerk's services are to be set by the Bd.of 

(1) For filing and indexing assigni.cnt for the benefit of I selectmt 
creditors 

(2) For correcting errors in a record of birth 

(3) For furnishing a certificate of birth 

(4) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of birth 

(5) For entering delayed record of birth 

(6) For filing certificate of a person conducting business 
under any title other than his real name 

(7) For the filing by a person conducting business under any 
title other than his real name of a statement of change 
of his residence, or of his discontinuance, retirement 

or withdrawal from, or a change of location of such business 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 



Article 26 (Cont. ) 



(0) For furnishing certifiad copy of certificate of person 
conducting business under any title other than his real 
name, or a statement by such person of his discontinuance, 
retirement or withdrawal from such business 

(9) For recording the name and address, the date and number 
of the certificate issued to a person registered for the 
practice of podiatry in the Commonwealth 

(10) For correcting errors in a record of death 

(11) For furnishing a death certificate 

( 12 ) For issuing and recording licenses to junk collectors 

(13) For issuing and recording licenses to keepers of billiard 
saloons, pool or sippio rooms or tables, bowling alley, etc.: 

First table or alley 

Each additional table or alley 

(14) For entering notice of intention of marriage and issuing 
certificate thereof 

(15) For entering marriage certificate filed by persons outside 
the Commonwealth 

(16) For issuing certificate of marriage 

(17) For correcting errors in a record of marriage 

(18) For recording certificate of registration granted to a 
person to engage in the practice of optometry or issuing 
a certified copy thereof 

(19) For recording the name of the owner of a certificate of 
registration as a physician or osceopath in thu Cummonv«alth 

(20) For recording order granting locations of poles, piers, 
abutments or conduits, alterations or transfers .nereof, 
and increase in number of wires and cable or attachments 
under the provisions of Section 22 of Chapter 166: 

Each petition 

Each additional street or way 

(21) For examining records or papers relating to birth, marriage 
or deaths upon the application of any person, the actual 
expense thereof, but not less than 

(22) For copying any manuscript or record pertaining to a birth, 
marriage or death, per page 

(23) For receiving and filing of a complete inventory of all 
icems to/Tficluded in a "closing oat sale", etc. 

(24) For filing a copy of written statement or declaration of 
trust by the trustees of an association or trust, or any 
amendment thereof as provided in Section 2, Chapter 182 

( 25 ) Voter ' s card 

Article 26 passed by a MAJORITY VOTE. A quorum was present. 



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i6 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 3, 1989 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Tarn will vote to amend Article XII, Section 22, 
by deleting the section in its entirety and substituting the following: 

Section 22. Storage of Inflammables. 

STORAGE OF Fees for the Storage of Inflammables are to be set by the Board 

INFLAMMABLE , _ , 

-— j3 of Selectmen. 

Disapproval by Upon potion m^g ani duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article XII, 

A. G. Office 

May 5, 1989 Section 22, by deleting the Section in its entirety and substituting the 

following: 

Section 22. Storage of Inflarrmables 

Fees for the Storage of Inflammables are to be set by the Board 
of Selectmen. 

Article 27 passed by a MAJORITY VOTE. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate a sum not to exceed $1,000,000 for the installation of an 
eight-inch sanitary sewer line in Lowell Street, West Parish Drive, 



WEST PARISH 
DRIVE 



SEWER Birch Road and Thresher Road; betterments are to be assessed. 
On petition of Richard J. Schmidt and others. 

A reporL by the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$1,000,000 be hereby appropriated for the installation of an eight-inch 
sanitary sewer line in Lowell Street, West Parish Drive, Birch Road and 
Thresher Road; that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow not exceeding 
$1,000,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the Gen- 
eral Laws, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, 
and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and that betterments 
shall be assessed in connection with the project. 

The VOTE YES - 454 NO - 22 More than the 2/3 required. 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was 
VOTED to adjourn at 10:30 P.M. until Tuesday, April 4, 1989 at 7:00 P.M. 
at the J. Everett Collins Performing Arts Center on Shawsheen Road. 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 



i 7- 



The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 386 Voters 
admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, 
at 7:35 P.M. 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer fran available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of 

the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $85,000.00 for the purpose of 

extending water mains and making roadway improvements to Glenwood Road 

Extension. Betterments are to be assessed. rrniumn ra-iAn 

On petition of Jeffrey R. Picard and others. ~^*; ''^ 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien- E 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 29 
be approved as printed in the warrant in the amount of §85,000 and 
that the Town transfer the following amounts from the following 
available funds: 

Article 23 1934 Wood Hill Water Tank $ 2,480.46 
Article 16 1985 Wood Hill Water Tank $ 71,285.12 
Water Grant Acct. WSMAS #270 $ 11,234.42 

Betterments are to be assessed. 



WATER MAIN 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $75,000 for the construction of granite-curbed bituminous 
concrete sidewalks at the following locations and for the indicated 
approximate distances: 

ANDOVER STREET - North side from Shawsheen River Bridge, a distance 
of . . . 775 feet +/- 

CLARK ROAD - West side from Chester Street to Dascomb Road . . . 
2100 feet +/- 

said sum to be raised by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing; and further to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or 
by seizure by right of eminent domain such .land as may be required 
for these sidewalks; or take any other action related thereto. 
On petition of Sherron L. Heller and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to appropriate 
the sum of $75,000 for the cons cruet ion of granite-curbed bituminous 
concrete sidewalks at the following locations and for the indicated 
approximate distances: 

ANDOVER STREET - North side frcm Shawsheen River Bridge, a distance 
of . . . 775 feet 

CLARK ROAD - West side frcm Chester Street to Dascomb Road . . . 

2100 feet 

said sum to be raised by transfer from available funds. 



BALLARDVALE 
SIDEWALKS 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of 
the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $500,000, more or less, for 
the purpose of providing engineering designs and specifications for 
roadways, water distribution and water pumping facilities, and sani- 
tary sewers; and further, to authorize the Town Manager and the 

WATER, SEWER, 

AND ROAD Selectmen to petition the General Court for the passage of a special 

ENGINEERING ^ w authorizing the Town to issue notes in anticipation of any bonds 
FUNDS 

or notes authorized hereunder for a term in excess of two years, or 

to take any other action relative to the foregoing matters. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Susan 
G. Scott. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY 
that the sum of $500,000 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of 
providing engineering plans and specifications for roadways, water 
distribution and water pumping facilities and sanitary sewers; that 
to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to borrow not exceeding $500,000 under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(22), of the General Laws, as 
amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and, further, that the 
Town Manager and the Selectmen are authorized on behalf of the Town 
to petition the General Court for the passage of a special law 
authorizing the Town to issue notes in anticipation of the bonds 
or notes authorized hereby for a term in excess of two years. 

Tlie VOTE UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or by any combination of 
the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $100,000 for the purpose of 
installing storm drains; and to authorize the Board of Selectnen to 
STORM DRAINS acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the 
sum of $100,000 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of installing 
storm drains, including the cost of drainage easements and other 
expenses incidental and related thereto; that to raise this appro- 
priation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow not exceeding $100,000 under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the General Laws, as amended and supple- 
mented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefor; and that the Board of Selectmen is authorized 
to acquire the necessary drainage easements by gift, by purchase or 
by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

The VOTE YES - 255 NO - 10 More than the 2/3 required. 



-69- 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by 

transfer from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of 

the foregoing and appropriate a sum not to exceed $190,000.00 for the 

installation of an eight-inch sanitary sewer line in North Street 

from the end of the existing sewer at the Brookside development to 

Webster Street; betterments are to be assessed; and to authorize the NORTH STREET 

SEWER 
Town to accept a contribution from the developer towards the cost of 

the sewer; said contribution to be used to reduce the betterments 

assessed. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
$190,000 be hereby appropriated for the installation of an eight-inch 
sanitary sewer line in North Street from the end of the existing sewer 
at the Brookside development to Webster Street; that to raise this 
appropriation, the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow not exceeding $190,000 under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(1), of the General Laws, as amended and supple- 
mented, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes 
of the Town therefor; that betterments shall be assessed in connection 
with the project; and that the Town is authorized to accept a contri- 
bution from the developer toward the cost of the project; provided 
that said contribution shall be used to reduce the betterments assessed. 
The VOTE YES - 286 NO - 5 More than the 2/3 required. 
ARTICLE 34 . To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Allison Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 
Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Revision to STREET 

Jenkins Estates Definitive Plan in Andover and in North Andover, Ma. ACCEPTANCE - 

ALLISON WAY 
for Arthur W. Gauthier & Abbot Corporation", which plan is recorded 

with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 10395 and 

which way is also shown on a plan of land entitled "Jenkins Estates, 

Jenkins Rd. Andover, Ma." which plan is recorded with Essex North 

District Registry of Deeds in Book 9506. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others. 

Article 34 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Rachel Road, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 

STREET 
Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Revision to ACCEPTANCE - 

Jenkins Estates Definitive Plan in Andover and in North Andover, Ma. RACHEL ROAD 

for Arthur W. Gauthier & Abbct Corporation", which plan is recorded 

with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 10395 and 

which way is also shown on a plan of land entitled "Jenkins Estates, 

Jenkins Rd., Andover, Ma." which plan is recorded with Essex North 

District Registry of Deeds in Book 9506. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others. 

Article 35 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



-70- 



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ADJOURNED ANNUM, TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 



ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Penbrook Circle, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 

Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan 

STREET f pa,- Corners sect. II', which plan is recorded with Essex North 

ACCEPTANCE- 

PENBROOK District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8991. Also as shown on plan 

CIRCLE entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Penbrook Circle and Gina 

Jo way in Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 40' - Dated Jan. 6, 1987". 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 36 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Gina Jo Way, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 

Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Definitive 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE- Plan of Far Corners Sect . II ' , which plan is recorded with Essex North 

GINA JO WAY District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8991. Also as shown on plan 

entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Starr Ave. West in Andover, 

Mass. Scale: 1" = 40' - Dated Jan. 6, 1989". 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 37 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 

public way, Starr Avenue East, as shown on a plan which was approved by 

the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled 

STREET "Definitive Plan of Far Corners Sect. II", which plan is recorded with 

ACCEPTANCE - Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8991. Also as 

STARR AVENUE 

East shown on plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Starr Ave. West 

in Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 40' - Dated Jan. 6, 1987". 

On petition of Baroara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was reed by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it v/as VOTED to approve 

Article 38 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a 
public way, Starr Avenue West, as shown on a plan which was approved by 

the Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled 

STREET 

ACCEPTANCE- "Definitive Plan of Far Corners Sect. II", which plan is recorded with 

S TARR AVENUE Es sex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8991. Also as 
WEST 

shown on plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Starr Ave. 

West in Andover, Mass. Scale: 1" = 40' - Dated Jan. 6, 1987". 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning 3oard was reed by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 39 as printed in the warrant. 



-71- 



21-' 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Radcliffe Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the Andovsr Planning 

Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in 

Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex North District 

STREET ACCEPTANCE 



Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985 
On petition of Barbara M. Maren and o 
Article 40 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



RADCLIFFE DRIVE 
On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way, Yardley Road, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Belmont Park in 
Andover, Mass." dated June 8, 1973 and recorded with Essex North District 

Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 6985. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

^ • « D w « n t. YARDLEY ROAD 
On pet i. ion of Barbara M. Maren and ochers. 

Article 41 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Stafford Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 

Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Andover, 

Mass. Scale: 1" = 40" - July 29, 1982 - Dana F. Perkins & Assoc., Inc. 

Civil Engineers & Surveyors Lowell & Reading, Mass. Owner: Yvon Cormier 

Const. Corp.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry 

* r^ ,,-, » i «»,, STREET ACCEPTANCE 
of Deeds as Plan Nuntxar 8942. STAFFORD LANE 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 42 
as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 
way. Phoenix Place, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 

Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of 

* ™ n i ■ »_ , mm .». STREET ACCEPTANCE 
Land in Andover, Mass. of Phoenix Place Scale: 1 - 40' PHOENIX PLACE 

Date: June 28, 1983, Owner: Leno & Josephine Patti, Engineers, Dana P. 

Perkins & Assoc., Inc., which plan is recorded with Essex North District 

Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 9322. 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 43 

as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, I3elknap Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning 

Board, as shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Plan of Land of "Belknap 

Estates" in Andover, Mass." datod September 12, 1977 by Dana F. Perkins 

& Sons , Inc . , Civil Engineers & Surveyors , and recorded with Essex North 

STREET ACCEPTANCE 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 7781. BELKNAP DRIVE 

On petition of Barbara M. Maren and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 44 

as printed in the warrant . 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 



STREE T 
ACCEPTANCE- 
POND VIEW 
PLACE 



ARTICLE 45. That the road known as Pond View Place be accepted as a 
public way. 

On petition of Frank Federman and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 
Article 45 as printed in the warrant. 



STREET 
ACCEPTANCE- 
KNOLLCREST 
DRIVE 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way, Knollcrest Drive, as shown on a plan which was approved by the 

Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled 

"Definitive Plan of Knollcrest Acres, Andover, Massachusetts, Nysten 

Engineering & Associates, Scale: 1' = 40', December 10, 1984, revised 

February 2, 1985", which plan is recorded with Essex North District 

Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 9820. Also shown on plan entitled "Street 

Acceptance Plan of Knollcrest Drive in Andover, Massachusetts, 

Scale: 1" = 40'". 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 40 
as printed in the warrant . 



STREET 
ACCEPTANCE 
CAMPANELLI 
DRIVE 



ARTICLE 47. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 
Campanelli Drive as shown on a plan entitled: "Definitive Subdivision 
Plan River Road Business Center Andover, Mass." drawn by Bradford 
Saivetz & Associates, Inc. Engineers and Architects, as approved by 
the Planning Board, which plan is recorded with Essex North District 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 10256. 
On petition of Stephen L. Colyer and others. 
Article 47 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



STREET 
ACCEPTANCE 
SPENCER 
COURT 



ARTICLE 48. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 
SPENCER COURT as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 
SPENCER COURT" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

On petition of Reginald L. Harden and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOrED to approve 
Articlrj 48 as printed in the warrant. 



STREET 
ACCEPTANCE 
SPARTA 
DRIVE 



ARTICLE 49. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

SPARTA DRIVE as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

SPARTA DRIVE" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

Board of Selectmen. 

On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 49 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



-73- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 



23 



iRTICLE 50. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way DORIC 

JAY as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of DORIC WAY" as 

lpproved by the Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen. 

)n petition of Reginald L. Marden and others STREET ACCEPTANCE 

DORIC WAY 
UTtXCle 50 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

'.RTICLE 51. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

ESSINIA DRIVE as shown on a plan encitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

1ESSINIA DRIVE as approved by the Planning Bnard and laid out by the 

3oard of Selectmen. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

MESS IN IA DRIVE 
>n pet:.: ion of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 51 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

^RTICLE 52. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

^IICOLL DRIVE as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

VICOLL DRIVE" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

3oard of Selectmen. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

NICOLL DRIVE 
Dn petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 52 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 53. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

ODYSSEY WAY as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

ODYSSEY WAY" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

Board of Selectmen. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

ODYSSEY WAY 
On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 53 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 54 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way 

POLE HILL DRIVE as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

POLE HILL DRIVE" approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

Board of Selectmen. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

POLE HILL DRIVE 
On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 54 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



ARTICLE 55. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

LACONIA DRIVE as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

LACONIA DRIVE" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

Board of Selectmen. STREET ACC EPTANCE 

LACONIA DRIVE 
On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 55 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 56. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

ACROPOLIS CIRCLE as shown on a plan entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of 

ACROPOLIS CIRCLE" as approved by the Planning Board and laid out by the 

Board of Selectmen. STREET ACCEPTANCE 

ACROPOLIS CIRCLE 
On petition of Reginald L. Marden and others. 

Article 56 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 57. To petition the Andover Town meeting to accept as a public 

way GRANLI DRIVE as shown on a plan entitled "GRANLI ESTATES" dated 
STREET 
ACCEPTA NCE- February 7, 1985 and recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds on 

GRANLI DRIVE April 3, 1985 as Plan No. 9819, Book 1949, Page 238. The Definitive 

Plan as approved by the Planning Board is on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Joan Sweeney and others. 

Article 57 was WITHDRAWN. NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 58. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way 

Rogers Brook West as shown on a plan entitled "As Built Plan and Profile 
S TREET 
ACCEPTA NCE- Rogers Brook West . 

ROGERS BROOK on petition of Robert A. Fredrickson and others. 

WEST 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 58 

as printed in the warrant . 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public 

way. Pendant Court, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover 
STREET 
ACCEPTANCE- Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled PLAN OF LAND 

PENDANT COURT BEING A SUBDIVISION OF LAND SHOWN ON LAND COURT PLAN 40973A in 

ANDOVER, MASS. FEBRUARY 25, 1985 SCALE: 1" = 40'" Prepared by 

Merrimack Engineering Services, 66 Park Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

01810 and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds, 

Registered Land Section, as Plan No 40973B. Also as shown on plan 

entitled "Street Acceptance Plan of Land of Pendant Court in Andover, 

Mass. Scale: 1" = 40' - Oct., 1988". 

On petition of Noreen Austin and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 59 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of 

Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as anended by Chapter 126 of 
PROPERTY TAX 
EXEMPTIONS tne Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for 

Fiscal Year 1990 to those persons who qualify for property tax 

exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5. 

Uipon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 60 

as printed in the warrant in the amount of 100 per cent. 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and 

appropriate a sum not to exceed $3000 for the first year's operation, 
RECORD ING- 
SELECTMEN'S and Lj require that, henceforth, all regular and special meetings of 

MEETINGS tne Board of Selectmen of the Town of Andover shall be recorded 

officially in their entirety by means of a tape recorder or by other 

means of sonic reproduction, from the resulting recording of which 

copies and transcripts shall be made available to the public at no 

greater than actual cost . 

On perition of Samuel A. Moggio and others. 

Article 61 was DEFEATED. 



-75- 



25- 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning- Bylaw and 
and its accompanying Zoning Map, Article VIII of the Town Bylaws, as 
follows : 
That Lot 106 (14 Bartlet St.) on Assessors Map 39, be rezoned from rezone 

Single Residence A to General Business or pass or take any vote or 14 BARTLET ST. 

SRA to GB 
action relative thereto. 

On petition of Myron H. Muise and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Michael Houghton. 

Article 62 was DEFEATED. 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 

Commission to acquire by purchase or gift for conservation purposes, to 

assure the quality of the Town's water supply, under Massachusetts 

General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, the fee or any lesser interest in 

all or part of the following described parcel of land located in the 

watershed of Fish Brook: CONSERVATION 

.„. . „„ ACQUISITION- 

Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 150, 1.85 acres, more or less; HAARTZ 

supposed to be owned by Haartz et al, Bessie B., Thomas 

B. 6, John H. Noyes; located on the southerly side of 
High Plain Road; 

said acquisition to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer 

from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to 

authorize and direct the Conservation Commission with the approval of 

the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agreement 

that it deems advantageous with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

jnder the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for 

martial reimbursement of the costs of the acquisition of the above 

lescribed land; or take any ether action relative thereto. 

v report by the Andover Planning beard was read by Carl Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

article 63 as printed in the warrant. 

.RTICLE 64 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw to 
eet the new National Flood Insurance Program regulations as follows: 

o delete the second paragraph of Section III.B. and replace with a new 

action III.B. to read: ZONING BY-LAW- 



The boundaries of the Flood Hazard Overlay District shall, however, FT.OOD HAZARD 

OVERLAY 



iclese all those areas designated Zone A or Zone AE on the Federal DISTRICT 

nergency Management Agency 'Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), Town of Approved by 

A.G. 
xiover, Massachusetts, Essex County 1 effective date June 5, 1989, and „' Z -iqaq 

Flocdway on portions of Zone AE as shown on the above named plan, in 

>th cases as further specified in the Flood Insurance Study (FIS), all 

: which documents are on file with the Town Clerk, Planning Board and 

ispector of Buildings . " 

report by the Andover Planning Board was read by George Moran. 



-76- 



26 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

Article 64 (Cont. ) 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend 
the Zoning By-Law to meet the new National Flood Insurance Program regu- 
lations as follows: 

ZONING BY- To delete the second paragraph of Section III.B. and replace with a new 

LAW - FLOOD „ 

HAZARD Section III.B. to read: 

OVERLAY "The boundaries of the Flood Hazard Overlay District shall, however, en- 

DISTRICT 

close all those areas designated Zone A or Zone AE on the Federal Emergency 

Management Agency 'Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), Town of Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, Essex County' effective date June 5, 1989, and a Floodway on 

named 
portions of Zone AE as shown on the above/plan, in both cases as further 

specified in the Flood Insurance Study (FIS), all of which docunents are 
on file with the Town Clerk, Planning Board and Inspector of Buildings." 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
bylaw. Section V.B.2., by adding the following language: 
"h. When the distance between any two points on lot lines is less than 
ZONING BY-LAW 50 feet « measured in a straight line, the smaller portion of the lot 
LOT DIMENSIONS which is bounded by such straight line and such lot lines shall not 

Approved by be considered in computing the minimum lot area unless the cumula- 

A G 

.-_- tive distance along such lot lines between such two points is less 
May 5, 1989 a "^ 

than 150 feet." 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by George S. Moran. 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to 

amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw, Section V.B.2., by addinq the following 

language: 

"h. When the distance between any two points on lot lines is less than 
50 feet, measured in a straight line, the smaller portion of the lot 
which is bounded by such straight line and such lot lines shall not 
be considered in computing the minimum lot area unless the cumulative 
distance along such lot lines between such two points is less than 
150 feet." 

The VOTE UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
Bylaw, section II. 10. A., by striking the existing language and inserting 
the following in its place: 

"Lot Area: The horizontal area of a lot. The lot area required for 
LOT AREA zoning compliance shall be exclusive of any area in a street or way, 
public or private, open to the public whether or not recorded, or of 
any area within the lines of any easement or right-of-way for overhead 
or underground electrical or communications transmission lines (excluding 
individual service lines to structures), or of any area identified as a 
wetland as shown on maps entitled 'Wetland Areas of Andover, MA' or as 
determrjied by the Andover Conservation Commission." 



ZONING BY- 
LAW - 



-77- 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 C i' 

Article 66 (Cont. ) 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by George S. Moran. 
Article 66 v/as DEFEATED. 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will support the creation of a Human 

Services Council. The Council would be appointed by the Town Manager and 

confirmed by the Board of Selectmen no later than June 1, 1989. 

HUMAN SERVICES 
The proposed goals would be: COUNCIL 

1. To advocate for and encourage the developnent of community 
resources for the purpose of meeting human service needs. 

2. To encourage broad public/private participation in the 
determination of human service needs. 

3. To identify and bring to public attention unmet human service 
needs through participation in the developnent of a Hunan Services 
component ot the Townwide Master Plan survey. 

Proposals to further meet human services needs wxll be presented to all 

appropriate agencies and to the 1990 Town Meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 67 

as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to acquire by purchase or gift for conservation purposes, to 
assure the quality of the Town's water supply, under Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, the fee or any lesser interest in all or part 
of the following described parcel of land located in the watershed of 
Fish Brook: CONSERVATION 

Lot 10 of Assessors' Map 150, 1.1 acres, more or less; 



supposed to be owned by the estate of John Callahan,- CALLAHAN 
located on the southerly side of High Plain Road; 

said acquisition to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer 

from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to 

authorize and direct the Conservation Commission with the approval of 

the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agreement 

that it deems advantageous with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under 

the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for partial 

reimbursement of the costs of the acquisition of the above described 

land; or take any other action relative thereto. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 68 as printed in the warrant. 



-78- 



28 ADJOURN E D ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1939 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
Bylaws and the associated map by changing a certain parcel of land along 
Tewksbury presently zoned for General Residence to Light Industrial. 
The parcels of land in said Andover are bounded and described as follows: 

the land with the buildings thereon, comprising four (4) acres, more or 
less, situated on the Northerly side of Andover Street, partly in the 

REZONE LAND Town of Tewksbury in Middlesex County and partly in the Town of Andover, 

OFF LOWELL in Essex County, boundad and described as follows: 

STREET 

Beginning at the Southeasterly corner of the granted premises at a 

point in the Northerly line of said Andover Street, which is distant 75 

feet more or less Westerly from the intersection of the Tewksbury- Andover 

line with the Northerly line of said Andover Street; thence running at 

approximately a right angle Northly by Lots 5 and 3 on Land Court Plan 

H27170A filed with the Land Registration Office in Boston being land now 

or formerly of Ames Lake Realty Trust, 417.4 Feet; thence turning at a 

right angle and running Southerly by Lots 2 and 6 on said Land Court 

Plan, being land now or formerly of Ames Lake Realty Trust, 417.4 feet 

to said Andover Street; thence turning and running Easterly by said 

Andover Street, 417.4 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. 

There is excluded from the premises hereby conveyed about 432 square 
feet of the Northwesterly corner taken for Interstate Route 495 as 
evidenced by instrument of taking recorded with Essex North Deeds Book 
916, Page 418. 

There is also excluded a certain parcel of land conveyed to Patrick 
V. Zecco et ux, dated October 17, 1975 recorded with said Registries. 

Being the same premises conveyed to the grantors by deed dated 
December 11, 1975, recorded with Middlesex North Deads, Book 2176, 
Page 726 and Essex North Deeds, Book 1273, Page 2fa3. 

Said premises are conveyed subject to the restriction that any part 

of any building constructed on that portion of the premises in Tewksbury 

which is visible from Route 133 shall be constructed of brick or 

architectural block veneer and this restriction shall be appurtenant 

to land now owned by the Trustees of Merrimac Valley Industrial West 

trust on said Route 133. 

On petition of George Secchiaroli and others. 

Article 69 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to request Heme Rule Legis- 
lation from the Conmonwealth of Massachusetts to establish a 30-MPH 

30 MPH presumotive speed limit within the boundaries of the Town of Andover. 

PRESUMPTIVE 

c-.p pFn f.TMTT Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 70 as printed in the warrant. 



-79- 



29 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APR+L 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning 

Bylaw, Section II. 8., by adding the following Language to the end of 

the existing definition: ZONING BYLAW- 

FRONTAGE 
(strike period, add comma) . . .", in fact capable of providing safe DEFINITION 

vehicular and pedestrian access to the principal use of a lot . " AMENDMENT 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Michael Houghton. Approved by 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the May 5, 1989 

Andover Zoning Bylaw, Section I I. 8., by adding the following language 

to the end of the existing definition: 

(strike period, add ccmma) . . .", in face capable of providing safe 

vehicular and pedestrian access to the principal use of a lot . " 

The VOTE YES - 190 NO - 56 More than the 2/3 required. 



ARTICLE 72. To sec if the Town will vote to give permission to tha 
Selectmen to develop and 
Article 72 was WITHDRAWN 



TMPACT FTIFS 

Selectmen to develop and inpese impact fees on new developments. 



ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the following bond 

authorizations voted at the 1987 Annual Town Meeting: Article 65 — r , r ,„„,.., r ^ T .,„ 

RESCINDING 

$2,800,000, and Article 66 — 55,500,000. OF BOND 

Al ITVIOR T 7 AT TOf J9 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by John O'Brien. Auimmi^Aiims 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to rescind the 
following bond authorizations voted at the 1987 Annual Town Meeting: 
Article 65 — 52,800,000 and Article 66 — 55,500,000. 

ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 

Commission to acquire by purchase or gift for conservation purposes, to 

i •* _* *w_ m i i u CONSERVATION 

assure the quality of the Town's water suoply, under Massachusetts ,.,-^, ,T ~ T ^T,-^»■ 
, ACOUIblTION- 



Ceneral Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, the fee or any lesser interest in WEIDMAN 

all or part of the following described parcel of land located in the 

watershed of Haggetts Pond: 

Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 210, 8 acres, more or less; 
supposed to be owned by William K. Weidman, Jr.; 
located on the northerly side of Haggetts Pond Road; 

said acquisition to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer 

from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to 

authorize and direct the Conservation Commission with the approval of 

the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agreement 

that it deems advantageous with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under 

the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for partial 

reimbursement of the costs of the acquisition of the above described 

land; or take any other action relative tiereto. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 74 as printed in the warrant. 



-80- 



30 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Conmission to acquire by purchase or gift for conservation purposes, to 
assure the quality of the Town's water supply, under Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, the fee or any lesser interest in all or 
CONSERVATION part of the following described parcel of land located in the watershed 
of Fish Brook: 



ACQUISITION 
GAUTHIER 



CONSERVATION 
ACQUISITION- 
LEVESQUE 



Lot 2 of Assessors' Map 189, 8.54 acres, more or less; 
supposed to be owned by Arthur W. Gauthier; located on 
the southerly side of Chandler Road; 

said acquisiton to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer 

from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to 

authorize and direct the Conservation Conmission with the approval of 

the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agreement 

that it deems advantageous with the Corrmonwealth of Massachusetts, under 

the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for partial 

reimbursement of the costs of the acquisition of the above described 

land; or take any other action relative thereto. 

A report by the Andover Planning board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 

Article 75 as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 

Commission to acquire by purchase or gift for conservation purposes, 

under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C, the fee or any 

lesser interest in all or part of the following described parcel of land: 

Lot 56 of Assessors' Map 157, 2.75 acres, more or 
less; supposed to be owned by Gerald Levesque; 
located off Mar land Street on the easterly side; 

said acquisition to be made by funds raised by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing; and to 
authorize and direct the Conservation Commission with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town to enter into any agree- 
ment that it deems advantageous with the Cannonwealth of Massachusetts, 
under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 132A, Section 11, for 
partial reimbursement of the costs of the acquisition of the above 
descrioed land; or take any other action relative thereto. 
A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Carl J. Byers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve 
Article 76 as printed in the warrant. 



DIRECTION 
FOR 
BOARD OF 

SELECTMEN 



ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to direct the Board of 

Selectmen, henceforth, to allow no governmental action which would be 

detrimental to the existence of the Town of Andover as a town. 

On petition of Samuel A. Moggio and others. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by George S. Moran. 

Article 77 was DEFEATED. 



-81- 



31 

A DJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 4, 1989 

ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to rezone the property shown 
on Andover Assessor's Map No. 19 as Parcel 129, from SRA to APT, said 
parcel located at 149 Haverhill Street. REZONE 

On petition of Paul L. Twomey and others. HI HAV lrl^ ILL ST 

"^ 1 SRA to APT 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by George S. Moran. 
Article 78 was DEFEATED. 



Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was 
VOTED to dissolve the 1989 Annual Town Meeting at 10:20 P.M. 



ATTEST 




Elden R. Salter, CMC 
TOWN CLERK 



-82- 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN 
12-31-39 



STATE EQUALIZED VALUATION $3,280,828,000.00 

BORROWING CAPACITY 5% 164,041,400.00 

TOWN DEBT 12-31-89 $23,310,000.00 

LESS DEBT OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT: 

1975-West Andover Sewer $ 690,000.00 

1976- Water Storage Reservoir 270,000.00 

1982-School Renovation* 3,900,000.00 

1984- Water 800,000.00 

1986-Water 3,930,000.00 

1987-Water 180,000.00 

1988-Water Treatment Plant 1,400,000.00 

1989-Water Treatment Plant 4,575,000.00 



$15,745,000.00 

DEBT OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT: 

1976-Conservation Land $ 240,000.00 

1984-Parking Facility 350,000.00 

1984-TownHall 375,000.00 

1986-Sewer 3,690,000.00 

1986-River Road 865,000.00 

1988-Land Acquisition 450,000.00 

1988-Sewera 225,000.00 

1988-School Computers 320,000.00 

1989-School Compute™ 375,000.00 

1989-Land Acquisition 335,000.00 

1989-Sewer 340,000.00 



$ 7,565,000.00 

BORROWING CAPACITY $ 156,476,400.00 

LEASES: 

1984-Library $ 4,090,000.00 

1984-Town Hall 2,305,000.00 

1984-Town Hall 185,850.00 

1989-Library 2,600,000.00 



$ 9,980,850.00 



AUTHORIZED UNISSUED DEBT: 

1982-84-Riverina Road $ 1,866,837.00 

1985-Sewers 1,565,000.00 

1987-Water Treatment Plant 12,500,000.00 

1987-School Computers 1,000,000.00 

1987-Conservation Land 1,000,000.00 

1987-Water 1,300,000.00 

1987- Affordable Housing 8,300,000.00 

1988-Stack Property 155,000.00 



$ 27,686,837.00 



TOTAL DEBT 12-31-89 

OUTSIDE DEBT $ 13,355,000.00 

INSDE DEBT 7,595,000.00 

LEASES 7,908,550.00 



$ 28,858,000.00 



-83- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1989 

GROUP I 

INCLUDED IN ASSESSOR' ESTIMATES 

1989 
ACTUAL REVENUE 

DISTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENTS FROM STATE 6,01 6,346.33 

MOTOR VEHICLE & TRAILER EXCISE TAXES 2,633,750.32 

HOTELVMOTEL TAX 561,254.00 

LICENSES 147,009.91 

FINES 264,277.60 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 39,700.59 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 1 20,503.80 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 660,584.48 

TOTAL HEALTH AND SANITATION 79,563.00 

SCHOOL 6,017.50 

RECREATION 256,729.94 

PUBLIC SERVICE ENTERPRISES 3,467,838.13 

CEMETERIES 9,035.00 

LIBRARIES 205,705.75 

INTEREST 479,238.87 



14,947,555.22 



GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 

TAX TITLE REDEMPTIONS 53,800.85 

TAX TITLE COSTS 74.50 

RESTITUTION OF DAMAGES 252.00 

BID DEPOSITS 312.50 

DEPARTMENTAL REIMBURSEMENTS 1 ,653,059.32 

SALE OF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT 1 ,407.00 

MISCELLANEOUS ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 1 3,020.44 

PETTY CASH 1,550.00 

STATE REIMBURSEMENT 4,938.00 

FEDERAL REIMBURSEMENT 4,367.00 



1,732,781.61 



-84- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1989 

GROUP III 

AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



1989 
ACTUAL REVENUE 



PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES 

REAL ESTATE TAXES 

TRUST FUND 

MATURITIES OF INVESTMENTS 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS 

TAILINGS 

FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING: 

ENTITLEMENTS 

INVESTMENT INCOME 
SEWER RATES 

SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM-ELDERLY 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM-STATE 
SCHOOL AID 

DOG LICENSES TO COUNTY 
SALE OF DOGS 
FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 
OFF STREET PARKING METERS 
SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 
ATHLETIC PROGRAM 
LOCKER RENTALS 
CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARES 
CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS 
CEMETERY FLOWER FUNDS 
COUNCIL ON AGING REVOLVING 
POLICE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
FIRE OFF DUTY DETAILS 
SALE OF TRASH BAGS 
GUARENTEE DEPOSITS 
MEALS TAXES 

INSURANCE CLAIM REFUNDS 
CH 71 SEC 71 E CUSTODIAL 
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES 
TEMPORARY LOAN-FED AID 
BOND ISSUE PROCEEDS 
PREMIUM ON BONDING PROCEEDS 
ACCRUED INTEREST ON BOND PROCE 



GRAND TOTAL 



89.88 

42,632.07 
87.912.31 

5,615.00 

219.00 

8,891.15 

51,114.47 

509,526.38 

24,931.38 

4,279.48 

17,972.00 

9.133.00 

1,000.00 

113,394.95 

344,373.42 

6,325.50 

300.00 

31,637.85 

1,997.58 

7,201.23 

22,941.42 

7,450,000.00 

4,000,000.00 

2,950.000.00 

6,997.50 

2,057.36 



423,936.69 

33,990,087.36 

629.410.29 

26,364,169.33 

6,234.330.68 

8,053.50 



89.88 
1,773,884.18 

130,544.38 
776,700.56 



746,076.81 



384,634.35 



14,439,197.51 



85,901,115.52 
102,581,452.35 



-85- 



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-91- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

JUNE 30, 1989 



ASSETS 

Cash and Equivelants 
Accounts Recievables: 

Property Taxes 

Excise Taxes 

Water & Sewer Charges 

Tax Liens 

Departmental Revenue 

Special Assessments 

Due from other Governments 



Total Cash & Recievables 



Other Assets 

Tax Possessions 
Amounts to be Provided for: 
Long Term Obligations 

Total Assets 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Warrants Payable 
Accrued Payroll Withholdings 
Reserve for Abatements 
Deferred Revenue 
Due to Other Governments 
Unclaimed Items 

Excess on Sales of Low Value Land 
Guarantee Deposits 
Bond Anticipation Notes 
Bonds Payable-Inside Debt Limit 
Bonds Payable-Outside Debt Limit 
Lease Obligations 

Total Liabilities 



GENERAL 


CAPITAL 


SPECIAL 


LONG-TERM 


GRAND 


FUND 


PROJECT 


REVENUE 


OBLIGATIONS 


TOTAL 


4,817,481.39 


3,358,414.33 


524,123.93 




8,700,019.65 


1,245,712.71 








1,245,712.71 


328,333.31 








328,333.31 


1,054,857.07 








1,054,857.07 


787,217.00 








787,217.00 


56,860.31 








56,860.31 


272,444.65 








272,444.65 


519,514.33 








519,514.33 


9,082,420.77 


3,358,414.33 


524,123.93 


0.00 


12,964.959.03 


67,408.27 








67,408.27 




11,450,000.00 




27,330,850.00 


38,780,850.00 


9,149,829.04 


14,808,414.33 


524,123.93 


27,330,850.00 


51,813,217.30 


(65,436.00) 








(65,436.00) 


(132,294.73) 








(132.294.73) 


(674,213.74) 








(674,213.74) 


(3,391,610.99) 




(277.63) 




(3,391,610.99) 
(277.63) 


(41,156.35) 








(41,156.35) 


(4,305.74) 








(4,305.74) 


(43,796.08) 


(11,450,000.00) 




(7,525,000.00) 

(12,055,000.00) 

(7,750,850.00) 


(43,796.08) 
(11,450.000.00) 

(7.525.000.00) 
(12,055,000.00) 

(7,750.850.00) 



(4,352,813.63) (11,450,000.00) 



(277.63) (27,330,850.00) (43,133.941.26) 



Fund Balances 
Unreserved 
Reserved for: 

Continued Appropriations 

Encumbrances 

Reserve for Special Purposes 
Designated for: 

Over/Under Assessments 

Appropriation Deficits 

Revenue Deficits 

Court Judgements 



Total Fund Balances 



Total Liab. & Fund Balance 



(2,555,111.41) 

(686,633.72) (3,296,879.77) 
(1,134,521.07) (61,534.56) 

(420,000.00) 

(15,028.77) 

(1,320.44) 

(400.00) 

16,000.00 



(518,019.59) 



(5.826.71). 



(4,797,015.41) (3,358,414.33) 
(9,149,829.04) (14,808,414.33) 



(3.073.131.00) 

(3.983,513.49) 

(1,201,882.34) 

(420,000.00) 

(15,028.77) 

(1.320.44) 

(400.00) 

16.000.00 



(523.846.30) 0.00 (8.679.276.04) 

(524,123.93) (27,330.850.00) (51.813,217.30) 



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-97- 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 

YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1989 



Employees' Payroll Deductions 

State Grants 

State and County Assessments 

Refunds: 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Taxes 

Water Rates and Services 

Sewer Charges 

Interest and Demands 

Miscellaneous 
Petty Cash 

Off-duty Work Details 
Miscellaneous Trust Funds 
Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 
Unemployment Compensation 
Insurance Fund 
Fishing Licenses to State 
Walter Raymond Fund 
Lucy Shaw Fund 
Police Department Drug Abuse 
Investment Funds 
Temporary Borrowing 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses 
Andover Athletic Program 
Community ASK 
Music Revolving 
Telethon Revolving 
Collaborative Revolving 
Metropolitan Life Revolving 
Physical Education Revolving 
Chapter 71 Sec 71 E 
Council on Aging 
Tailings 
Meals Taxes 
Court Judgements 
Fireworks - Gift 
Damage Restitution 
Tot Lot 

Tax Title Expenses 
River Road 
Chapter 90 Funds 
Community Garden Project 
Frontage Road 
Bond Deposit 
Old Town Hall Restoration 
Guarantee Deposits 



6,151,668.13 
699,858.54 
568,423.77 



489,341.67 
6,955.60 
44,783.48 
22,143.24 
17,066.95 
10,229.61 
13,270.76 



9,356.00 
183.66 
949.96 

1,475.00 



355,260.87 
327,738.87 



603,791.31 

1,550.00 

356,443.33 

37,245.13 

522,449.10 

27,105.00 

8.855.07 

52,195.22 



11,964.62 

28,607,483.92 

3,875,000.00 



682,999.74 

19,117.64 

1,671.25 

95.00 

759.77 

5,770.00 

61.80 

1,056.00 

24,187.36 

40,595.67 

602.00 

1,959.90 

16,000.00 

500.00 

5,500.00 

1,634.42 

9,753.75 

79,271.23 

272,993.92 

1,864.88 

8,821.04 

140.00 

31,513.25 

53,055.00 

42,783,956.76 



-98- 



ARTICLE 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1989 

PROJECT NAME 



AUTHORIZATION 



ART 43, 1 982 RIVERINA ROAD 

ART 21 , 1 984 RIVERINA ROAD PLANT EXPANSION 

ART 1 A, 1 987 WATER TREAT PLANT EXPANSION 

ART 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

ART 26, 1 985 SEWER-LOWELL ST (BETTERMENTS) 

ART 29, 1986 OLD TOWN HALL-ENGINEER/DESIGN 

ART 18, 1 987 SCHOOL COMPUTERS 

ART 21 , 1 987 CONSERVATION FUND 

ART 37, 1987 WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 

ART 26, 1988 STACK PROPERTY 

ART 20, 1 989 SHED TEMPORARY CLASSROOMS 

ART 25, 1989 ANDOVER HIGH SCHOOL ROOF 

ART 28, 1 989 SEWER-LOWELL ST/WEST PARISH DR 

ART 31, 1989 ENGINEERING SPECS 

ART 32, 1989 STORM DRAINS 

ART 33, 1 989 SEWER-NORTH STREET 



1,000,000.00 

866,837.00 

12,500,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

65,000.00 

150,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

1,300,000.00 

155,000.00 

150,000.00 

500,000.00 

1,000,000.00 

500,000.00 

100,000.00 

190,000.00 

21,976,837.00 



-99- 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Ciai! L. Ralston, Ch. - 1991 

James M. Barenboim, V.Ch. - 1990 
Gerald H. Silverman, Sec. - 1992 
Charles H. Wesson, Jr. - 1992 

William T. Downs - 1990 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Richard A. Savrann - 1990 

Ronald C. Hajj - 1991 

Mary Jane Powell - 1993 

Eileen M. Connolly - 1989 

Francis A. McNulty* 

* Appointed by Commissioner 

of Dept. of Comm. Affairs. 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31. 1989 
ELECTIVE 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Margo T. Tilghman, Ch. - 1990 

Susan T. Poore - 1991 

Michael A. Frishman - 1991 

Andres C. Salazar - 1992 

Richard L. Hubbell - 1992 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Gerald Grasso, Andover - 1991 
Terrence L. Breen, Methuen 
Kenneth T. Hamilton, Methuen 
Leo L. LaMontagne. Lawrence 
Francis J. McLaughlin, Lawrence 
Evelyn A. Burke/Lawrence 
John J. Caffrey, No. Andover 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty H"990 



TRUSTEESLCO RNFII F1INT) 

Alcide J . Legendre 
John J. Williams 
Edwin F. Reidel 



TRUSTEE PUNCHARD 
FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger - 1991 
Joan M. Lewis 
John R. Petty 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Frederick A. Pease, Jr. 
Reverend James A. Diamond 
Reverend Graham L.N. Ward 



APPOINnVE 
TOWN MANAGER - Kenneth R. Mahony 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS - Kenneth R. Seifert 



FINANCE 

Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 
Theodore Taylor, Jr. 
Frederic A. Stott 
Peter J. Volpe 
Jeffrey D. Sheehy 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald 
Edward A. Weil 
Virginia S. Keaton 
Donald F. Schroeder 



BOARD OF RETIREMENT 

William T. Downs 
Leo F. Daley 
Rodney P. Smith 



MERRIMACK VALLEY PLAN.COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 



TRUSTEES MEMORIAL HALL LIB. 

Patricia H. Edmonds 
Margery T. Clark 
Richarcf L. Alden 
Margaret I. Jurgen 
Joseph A. Glasser 
Karen M. Herman 
Maria A. Rizzo 



INDUSTRIAL DEV. FINANCING AUTH. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Michael W. Morris 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
Robert A. Finlayson 



DEVELOPMENT & INDUS. COMM. 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Robert A. Finlayson 
Thomas J. Swift 
Paul W. Cronin 
S. Joseph Hoffman 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Wesley E. Whitney, Ch. 
Jane E. Griswold 
John R. Bryden 
Wallace L. Bolton 
Carol C. McDonough 

Associate Members: 

Pamela H. Mitchell 

Peter F. Reilly 

C. Ryan Buckley 

Paul D. Bevacqua 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

John R. Williams 
Alice M. Hart 
Robert R. Schmidt 
Elden R. Salter 

CONSERVATION COMM. 

Robert A. Pustell 
Donald D. Cooper 
Philip F. Wormwood 
John Dugger 
Scott Matsumoto 
Judith M. Chupasko 
Mark S. Curtin 

REUSE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Ruth H. Dunbar 
Richard E. Chapell 
Paul W. Cronin 
Susan G. Stott 
Susan B. Dennett 
Donald J. Mulvey 
Mary T. Bartow 
Sherron L. Heller 
Norma A. Gammon 

ANDOVER ARTS COUNCIL 

Norma A. Gammon 
Mary G. Bailey 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Margaret A. Pustell 
John F. Zipeto 
Katherine Hoffman 

-100- 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

William H. Russell 
Archibald D. MacLaren 
Eugene S. Tworek 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar 
Dr. Stephen H. Loring 
John R. Kruse 



TOWLE FUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Wescott 
Marilyn R. Brody 

G.L. SANITARY DISTRICT 

Robert E. McQuade 

DESIGN ADVISORY COMM 

Susan B Dennett 
Nancy B. McBride 
Thomas P. McClearn 
Christopher S. Doherty 
Donald J. Harding 



PLANNING BOARD 

Carl J.Byers 
Susan G. Stott 
John D. O'Brien 
Hooks K. Johnston 
William J. Dal ton 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Thomas F. Powers 
Robert P. Kenney 
Helen A. Watkinson 
Dorothy L. Bresnahan 
William L. Lane 
Mary G. Bailey 
Thomas Duran 
Irving Gershenberg 
Agnes Gallagher 
Doreen Correnti 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John S. Sullivan 

Bemice M. Haggerty 

Thomas J. O'Leary 

Karen M. Herman 

John S. Dugger 

Philip K. Allen - Ch. Emeritus 



COMMITTEE ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 

Andrew A. Shea 
Myron H. Muise 
Rooert A. Henderson 

TRUSTEES OF SPRING 
GROVE CEMETERY 

Gilbert J. Cromie 
Charles A. Bergeron 
Paul W. Cronin 
Rebecca A. Backman 
Irving J. Whitcomb 
Lawrence J. Hesinius 



CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Annetta R. Freedman 
John R. Dempsey 
James P. Murphy 
Susan K. O'Neill 
Andres Ninos 

ANDOVER HOUSING PARTNERSHIP/ 
FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Carl J. Byers 

David Hastings 
Christopher D. Haynes 
J. Alan McAnally 
Thomas J. O'Leary 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY 

STREET OF FLAGS COMMITTEE 

John J. Lewis 
Richard J. Bo wen 
John J. Doherty 
Harold F. Hayes 
James L. Bamford 
Robert M. Henderson 
William MacKenzie 
Edward J. Morrissey 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 
COMMTITEE 

Kenneth DeBenedictis 
Nancy B. Brother 
John J. Barry 
Robert P. Kenney 
Dr. Robert Katz 
Arthur W. Iworsley 
Rosalie Bialy 

SHED BOARD OF 

DIRECTORS 

Kenneth L. DeBenedictis 
Bonnie L. Krentcil 
Martin Cotton 
Karen M. Stitham 



************************************************************* 

UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Edward M. Kennedy. 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 
John Kerry, 2003 JFK Federal Bldg., Boston 

SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT 

Patricia McGovern - 74 Saunders St., Lawrence 
SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

Susan C. Tucker, 6 Farrwood Drive, Andover 
FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 
Chester Atkins, 134 Middle St., Lowell 
FIFTH COUNCILOR DISTRICT 

John F. Markey, 246 Turnpike Road, North Andover 




-101- 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1989 



Animal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Community Development Department 

Director of Health Everett F. Penney 

Inspector of Buildings Sam J. DeSalvo 

Director of Planning Stephen L. Colyer 

Electrical Inspector Richard J. Salenas 

Plumbing, Gas Sewer Inspector Bruce P. Hale 

Council On Aging Mary A. Byrne 

Finance and Budget Director Anthony J. Torrisi 

Assessor William J. Krajeski 

Collector/Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

Data Processing Manager Barbara A. Botsch 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Veteran's Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Fire Chief. Harold F. Hayes 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James W. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla, Jr. 

Housing Authority Executive Director Nancy M. Marcoux 

Municipal Maintenance Director Frederick L. Jaeschke 

Building Superintendent Kenneth H. Parker 

Forestor (Cemetery, Forestry, Parks) James L. Bamford 

PHE Superintendent James J. Brightney 

Police Chief James F. Johnson 

Dog Officer Wayne Nadar 

Public Works Director Robert E. McQuade 

Highway Superintendent Theodore A. Surette 

Town Engineer John Avery, Jr. 

Memorial Hall Library Director Nancy C. Jacobson 

Town Accountant Rodney P. Smith 

Town Clerk Randall L. Hanson 

Town Counsel Alfred L. Daniels 



-102- 



INDEX 



Animal Control 22 

Animal Inspection 23 

Board of Selectmen 3 

Civil Defense 21 

Community Dev. & Planning 39 

Building Inspection 39 

Conservation 47 

Electrical Inspection 41 

Health 42 

Planning Board 39 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 41 

Zoning Board 41 

Community Services 24 

Council on Aging 25 

Directory of Town Officials 100 

Directory of Department Heads 102 

Finance & Budget 7 

Assessors 9 

Central Purchasing 8 

Collector/Treasurer 10 

Veterans Services 16 

Financial Statements 83 

Fire Department 17 

Game Warden 23 

Greater Lawrence Tech . School 26 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 38 

Historical Commission 31 

Housing Authority 48 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 13 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 13 

Memorial Hall Library 50 

Municipal Maintenance 32 

Building 32 

Forestry 34 

Parks 33 

Plumbing, Heating & Electrical 34 

Spring Grove Cemetery 10 

Vehicle Maintenance 35 

Police Department 20 

Public Works Department 36 

Engineering 36 

Highway 37 

Sewer 38 

Water 37 

Recycling 14 

Town Clerk 6 

Town Counsel 16 

Town Manager 1 

Town Meeting Minutes 51 

Trustees Punchard Free School 28 

-103-